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    Originally posted by Tezcatlipoca View Post
    Looks like they're killing off the x-men because nobody wants to buy inhumans.
    It's all pretty much just a shitty rehash of decimation.

    Terrigen mist mysteriously kills mutants and suppresses x-gene now. (Despite the fact that countless mutants were in the thick of it post infinity.)

    Now the remaining mutants have to find a way to survive in a world that fears and blah blah.

    Marvel must really loom down on the intelligence of their consumers. Keep in mind that the effects of m-day were undone only two years ago.

    Comment


      I've always liked the status quo of M-day, though. Some of the best stories came from that era.

      I don't like the mcu type changes they are trying with the inhumans. If you guys watch agents of shield. You notice they're definitely a pseudo mutant group.

      Comment


        Originally posted by Tomie View Post
        I've always liked the status quo of M-day, though. Some of the best stories came from that era.

        I don't like the mcu type changes they are trying with the inhumans. If you guys watch agents of shield. You notice they're definitely a pseudo mutant group.
        True to that. Messiah War, Messiah Complex, Kyle & Yost's X-Force, Curse of the Mutants, Second Coming, X-Infernus, Age of X, X-Necrosha etc.

        Still though it's stupid becuase we just went through this. . .instead of focusing on the numerus amounts of new mutants that sparng up post AVX they do this only to push the Inhumans. It's pretty annoying because the X-Books are seemingly the only books worth a damn from Marvel nowadays.

        I mean Marvel just has to face the fact that all the Inhumans out side of literally four suck ass.

        Comment


          I need to reed Infernus. How good is it? Also, which runs do you plan on picking up.

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            Infernus is pretty much what every Magik fanboy ever wanted. It also brought Legion back.

            Post SW? I'll probably give Extra X-Men a go all though I'm very, very cautious with it. First issue could be mah last depending on where they wanna go with it. Definitely getting Uncanny. Even if it didn't have seventy percent of my favorite mutants showing up, it's being written by Cullen Bunn and I have a lot of faith in his pen.

            Not a fan of Laura being "Wolverine" due to the fact that they'reseemingly trying to ignore the reason Logan was given the name areason that pretty much goes against the precious little growth as a character she's had, but Bendis already decimated her in ANXM so why not? I'll give that one a run too because I really like Laura and have hopes of her being redeemed, but again the first issue may be my last.

            As of now ANXM is a diseased skunk with fleas to me. No doubt Oya and Genesis are gonna be ruined and the premise "Cylops is the bad guy" is a no sell for me. Don't even get me started on the O5 still being there. The real All-New X-Men should've been Eyeboy, QQ, Oya, Broo, Shark Girl and Hellion. Their more agressive counterparts should be the Cuckoos, Triage, Hijack, and Benjamin. Especially after what happened to Fabio. If Marvel really wanted the new generation to move in for the kill then they would've done this as opposed to ever bringing back the four characters that alrady exist in continuity only to throw the tag "All-New" on them. The could've groomed Hijack into one of the best X-Men ;eaders period under the right pen. Instead we get this garbage. So yeah screw ANXM.

            I'm gonna be keeping up with Old-Man Logan too.

            This will be the first time that I'll be buying comics issue to issue so Marvel don't let me down. . .

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              Quick questions:

              1. What books should I read to get up to speed with with X-man a.k.a. Nate Grey?

              2. Who's stronger: Exodus or Nate Grey?

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                There's his series X-Man which was pretty long for a solo and he had a short appearance in Dark Reign, but the last book I saw he was in was New Mutants vol. 3. Pretty much about him living with the New Muties off of Utopia and trying to deal with being depowered.

                As for your second question Exodus is probably considerably more skilled in the use if all his powers, but Nate has far too much raw power. At their peaks Nate would win. They actually fought and Nate won although Exodus already had injuries.

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                  Damn, X-men is so good. It's hard reading non-X-men books lol.

                  Comment


                    Originally posted by Tomie View Post
                    Damn, X-men is so good. It's hard reading non-X-men books lol.
                    Truth

                    Comment


                      I found a pretty good write up about Nate Grey/X-Man and the X-books from around the AOA to Onslaught era. It's pretty long and you might want to brew a cup of coffee while you're reading. But, it's a worthwhile read. One of the things I didn't know was that Onslaught was a direct sequel to AOA. That really took me for a ride. I dunno if any of you have read those books, but I'm gonna assume you did. It's a good read for people who have.

                      Part one:




                      If you weren't around and reading mainstream comics in the mid-90s, it might be hard to understand now just how big a deal the Age of Apocalypseactually was. It wasn't just the biggest X-Men crossover of the era, it was possibly the biggest X-Men crossover ever, and by extension one of the biggest crossovers - full stop - of all time. It came in a year - 1995 - when the industry was already feeling the negative consequences of the excesses of the early 90s, but had not yet become quite so desolate as it would be following the Hero's World debacle and Marvel's bankruptcy. Stores were disappearing but people still didn't fully understand the extent of how poor the retail fundamentals behind the early 90s bubble actually were. The X-Men had long since weathered that storm and, after a brief period wherein Image comics had wrested some of the attention away from Marvel's flagship franchise, reasserted their unquestioned dominance as the number one commercial force in the industry. It was enough that anyone on the ground floor of the industry - that is, a regular Joe reading Wizard and buying their comics at the local comic shop (assuming your local comic shop hadn't already gone broke the year before) - could still convince themselves that all was well, and the industry was as hale and hearty as it had ever been.

                      Looks could be deceiving. The years immediately following the Image exodus may have seen the X-Men continue to maintain their industry dominance, but the books themselves floundered. It took them a long time to recover from losing Chris Claremont's guiding hand - without one single creative vision (and really, it was only obvious in hindsight just how much of Marvel's success in the 80s and early 90s was due to his specific and particular talents) the books lurched from story to story with little in the way of consistency or even a solid narrative thru-line. It didn't help that, in the years immediately preceding the split, the Image creators had birthed a plethora of purpose-less characters and plotlines, most of which were left completely hanging when the creators vacated in 1992. So the people left holding the bag - journeymen like Scott Lobdell and Fabian Nicieza - were stuck telling years worth of stories for the purpose of cleaning up other people's messes. (By which I mean: Cable's origin, Stryfe, the Six Pack, Bishop, the X-Ternals, et al.)

                      Sean Howe's recent Marvel Comics: The Untold Story details the chain of events surrounding the Image founders' departure, and the picture that emerges with twenty years' (!!!) hindsight is, while not surprising, still sad: the Image founders left at the last possible moment before work actually began on 1992's big X-crossover, X-Cutioner's Song. That crossover set the tone for the first couple years' of post-Image X-Men books - needlessly convoluted, weighted down by dozens of superfluous characters at every turn, lacking anything even remotely resembling Claremont's deft hand at long-term characterization. Still, it was enough of a success to convince the industry that Marvel and the X-Men remained dominant commercial forces even after losing every marquee creator associated with the franchise. It didn't matter that the folks in charge were essentially making it up as they went along - the trains rolled on time, the characters remained popular, and for the most part the fans didn't seem to care that the books were terrible. (Not that the post-Claremont, pre-Image exodus books had been great shakes, either, but they at least had the virtue of being produced by the creators fans actually wanted to read.)

                      And so, after X-Cutioner's Song the X-Books settled into a predictable pattern of jumping from crossover to crossover. Readers got used to the fact that nothing important usually happened in non-crossover books, and the creators actually got to be pretty good at playing to these expectations. BothUncanny and the adjectiveless X-Men book developed a pretty clever rhythm, where a big event was followed by a handful of issues devoted to smaller melodramatic character studies and less consequential plot points, all the while laying the groundwork by foreshadowing whatever the next crossover would be - X-Cutioner's Song into Fatal Attractions into Bloodties (a crossover with the main Avengers books designed to celebrate the 30th anniversaries of both franchises) into the Phalanx Covenant, with a brief stopover along the way for the wedding of Cyclops and Jean Grey. It was not, perhaps, the most graceful or subtle method of publishing comics, but it worked, and this business plan to a large degree dictates the way superhero comics are sold and published to this day.

                      The "problem" - and I am hopefully deploying these scare quotes in a sufficiently judicious manner - is that these crossovers just weren't big enough.Fatal Attractions was only six issues long, and while it featured a number of significant plot developments (Magneto's return, Colossus's defection, Wolverine losing his Adamantium), it was still - in publishing terms - a small crossover. The Phalanx Covenant was only nine issues long, and while it helped launch the highly anticipated (and inevitable) Generation X spin-off, it also featured the Phalanx - maybe not the least popular X-villains, but surely nowhere near anyone's top pick. All of which is to say - at some point, despite the fact that the books remained popular, someone somewhere took note of the fact that the line - by restricting itself to relatively restrained intra-line crossovers - was seriously underperforming. Add to this the fact that sales were dropping across the entire industry - due to the mass exodus of readers and mass extinction of retailers that followed in the wake of the early 90s implosion - and the ingredients were all assembled for what would soon become the perfect storm of mid-90s crossovers, the era-defining, immensely popular, critically acclaimed, industry-malaise-defying mega-juggernaut Age of Apocalypse.

                      I don't think it's possible to exaggerate just how important the Age of Apocalypse was to mid-90s Marvel. At a time when the industry was beginning to look very pallid indeed, the story represented a serious and sustained shot in the arm. But, even if we didn't know it at the time, the story would also be the era's high water mark. Not only would the success of the Age of Apocalypse lead directly to the subsequent overexpansion and commercial implosion of the X-Men franchise, but the attempt to capitalize on the success of the storyline would soon metastasize across the entire Marvel line. The Age of Apocalypse was Marvel's biggest hit in years, and the company soon sought to replicate that success across every other franchise. The results would be disastrous.

                      And of course, no character better exemplifies this era than our friend, Nate Grey, the titular X-Man himself.



                      Comment


                        Here's the link and I'll post more after class.

                        http://whenwillthehurtingstop.blogsp...1-1996-by.html

                        Comment


                          Interesting read. Makes me sad to think that Marvel went from stories like Fatal Attractions and I, Magneto to this "All-New X-Men" garbage. It'll never be the same.

                          Nothng in comics will ever live up to the 80's and 90's X-Men in my opinion. Too much good.

                          Comment


                            Originally posted by Rabum Alal View Post
                            Interesting read. Makes me sad to think that Marvel went from stories like Fatal Attractions and I, Magneto to this "All-New X-Men" garbage. It'll never be the same.

                            Nothng in comics will ever live up to the 80's and 90's X-Men in my opinion. Too much good.

                            You think so? Not even the post M-Day stuff? X-men is really prolific, especially in the 80's and 90's. But, their are still stories assuming were counting the M-Day status quo. Was All New X-men that bad, though? I'm reading stuff like X-men: Legacy Vol.2 and I'm not feeling it at all. Which is wierd because I like Legion alot and I loved X-men: Legacy Vol.1. I didn't like Uncanny Avengers, but I didn't get up to World War hate and red onslaught. So, there's that.

                            Also, I always here praise about Astonishing X-men. How's that? Can you explain a bit about it?

                            Comment


                              Originally posted by Tomie View Post


                              You think so? Not even the post M-Day stuff? X-men is really prolific, especially in the 80's and 90's. But, their are still stories assuming were counting the M-Day status quo. Was All New X-men that bad, though? I'm reading stuff like X-men: Legacy Vol.2 and I'm not feeling it at all. Which is wierd because I like Legion alot and I loved X-men: Legacy Vol.1. I didn't like Uncanny Avengers, but I didn't get up to World War hate and red onslaught. So, there's that.

                              Also, I always here praise about Astonishing X-men. How's that? Can you explain a bit about it?
                              I meant everything AvX and afterwards. That's the garbage. Bendis and his goons managed to take the best incarnation of Cyclops(Gillen's) and assassinate him with no remorse in that disaster of an event. I enjoyed Legacy Vol. 2 because it finally buckled down on Legions character and pretty much took him beyond just being Chucks psycho plot device son. Si Spurrier is on of my favorite writers period and I love his character focus in all his books.

                              For you own good skip Red Onslaught and Axis as a whole if you can.

                              Astonishing(Whedon) took the X-Men back to its core. Pretty much like a modern take on the late 70's early 80's X-Men which is what EVERYBODY wanted after Morrisons convoluted yet enjoyable run of legend.

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                                Aight, I'll keep reading Legacy and Astonishing then. The only reason I kept reading Uncanny X-men was because Illyana, but that ending was garbage.

                                Comment


                                  Originally posted by Tomie View Post
                                  Aight, I'll keep reading Legacy and Astonishing then. The only reason I kept reading Uncanny X-men was because Illyana, but that ending was garbage.
                                  It was a disgrace.

                                  All-New X-Men was almost as bad. He could've actually went somewhere with the Utopians, but you know Bendis. . .

                                  Post SW Uncanny is being written by Cullen Bunn so there's light at the end of the tunnel. Just a bit iffy about Greg Land. . .

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                                    God, how does Land keep gettin work? I new Futures Imperfect would suck because he was the artist.

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                                      Worst of all he ends up on the most promising title after Secret Wars.

                                      Hopefully I'm counting on Bunn's writing to just completely blot it out.

                                      He's pretty much a god when writing mutants best of all is he genuinely likes the X-Men.

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                                        almost as bad as 2099 Hercules being a "drunken assaulter of women"

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                                        • Son of Perdition
                                          Son of Perdition commented
                                          Editing a comment
                                          Holy shit! I never seen so many speech bubbles in single panel in my life.

                                        • Issa
                                          Issa commented
                                          Editing a comment
                                          @Son of Perdition
                                          Ikr?

                                          It looks so try hard. Lol

                                        • The Poster Formerly Known as Teal
                                          Editing a comment
                                          ol' bubble blowing colossus

                                        Pure cringe.

                                        That's Disney for you.

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