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Why use online storage over physical?

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    Why use online storage over physical?

    By this I mean the subscription-based cloud storage services owned by either Apple, Microsoft, Google, or some other company whose sole purpose is to provide a file sharing spot? Is anyone like that here?
    It may be convenient by being able to access the stored material on any device that's logged in, but it's still internet-based as well as dependent on subscriptions as opposed to physical storage.

    #2
    The best of the best would be to use both with regular two way update but that one is rather costly solution
    My laughter when I see stupid posts:

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      #3
      Originally posted by PrezesE View Post
      The best of the best would be to use both with regular two way update but that one is rather costly solution
      Agreed, but one part is done in a single payment and the other is monthly or annually. Though it's a fair rate if you only pay $10 per month but have a steady job to keep that going.

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        #4
        Would anyone rather use online over physical though?

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          #5
          Investment versus commitment, I'd say. Seems to boil down to what people can afford and/or what kind of service they want.

          The investment in physical storage gives you permanent access to your own hardware that you can alter however you like if you're capable, but it requires more of an upfront payment and you usually end up having to take care of any issues yourself or through a third party service that charges another fat sum per trip.

          The commitment only asks for a modest price and you usually get a dedicated service team to reach out to, but you must pay the monthly price to maintain it, which usually ends up costing you more in the long run and most of these services are offered online, so it requires internet connection. Also the service is limited to the way it's designed and cannot be altered outside of its own capabilities.

          Personally I'm more partial to the latter because it's more convenient, but I'm not against physical and I can invest in it if I need to. For instance, when my HDD went kaput a few weeks ago, I had to get a new one, then later I realized that I could use my old one externally, so I wiped it and now I have an extra TB of storage at my disposal.
          Last edited by Thar; November 7th, 2019, 12:06 AM.

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            #6
            Originally posted by Thar View Post
            Investment versus commitment, I'd say. Seems to boil down to what people can afford and/or what kind of service they want.

            The investment in physical storage gives you permanent access to your own hardware that you can alter however you like if you're capable, but it requires more of an upfront payment and you usually end up having to take care of any issues yourself or through a third party service that charges another fat sum per trip.

            The commitment only asks for a modest price and you usually get a dedicated service team to reach out to, but you must pay the monthly price to maintain it, which usually ends up costing you more in the long run and most of these services are offered online, so it requires internet connection. Also the service is limited to the way it's designed and cannot be altered outside of its own capabilities.

            Personally I'm more partial to the latter because it's more convenient, but I'm not against physical and I can invest in it if I need to. For instance, when my HDD went kaput a few weeks ago, I had to get a new one, then later I realized that I could use my old one externally, so I wiped it and now I have an extra TB of storage at my disposal.
            Balancing the two is pretty much the better option if it can be afforded as accessing online storage offline requires a corresponding amount of space on the native drive. And depending on connections, that can be a bit of a problem if you can't access them offline.

            Hopefully SSD's get cheaper as they have a lower rate of failure than HDD's on the whole.

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              #7
              Because im careless of my shit

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                #8
                Just speaking as someone who moved from MS Word to Google Docs, it's nice not having to worry about bring flash drives everywhere until they get corrupted and lose all your work.
                Originally posted by Wade
                Everything is hidden in plain sight, like in Men in Black. We've all just been neuralized to think it is "normal".

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by OrganizationXV View Post
                  Just speaking as someone who moved from MS Word to Google Docs, it's nice not having to worry about bring flash drives everywhere until they get corrupted and lose all your work.
                  Considering it takes way more effort to corrupt a cloud drive than to lose a usb drive, I'll take those chances.

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by Thar View Post

                    Considering it takes way more effort to corrupt a cloud drive than to lose a usb drive, I'll take those chances.
                    That's what I meant. My flash drive got corrupted twice
                    Originally posted by Wade
                    Everything is hidden in plain sight, like in Men in Black. We've all just been neuralized to think it is "normal".

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by OrganizationXV View Post
                      Just speaking as someone who moved from MS Word to Google Docs, it's nice not having to worry about bring flash drives everywhere until they get corrupted and lose all your work.
                      You raise a good point there, not having to think about viruses and just signing in to whatever account your files are stored on is exceedingly convenient. However it still does require regular payments and if for some reason one is unable to keep up the payments, then... well you probably know the answer.
                      And being that it's an internet service, who knows what may happen to it one day?

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                        #12
                        Originally posted by TechTastic View Post

                        You raise a good point there, not having to think about viruses and just signing in to whatever account your files are stored on is exceedingly convenient. However it still does require regular payments and if for some reason one is unable to keep up the payments, then... well you probably know the answer.
                        And being that it's an internet service, who knows what may happen to it one day?
                        To be fair to my specific case, MS word is a subscription-based service but google docs isn't.

                        But that last bit is also a good point. Hopefully people would get enough warning to transfer stuff over, like how we found out about Flash shutting down two years in advance
                        Originally posted by Wade
                        Everything is hidden in plain sight, like in Men in Black. We've all just been neuralized to think it is "normal".

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by OrganizationXV View Post

                          To be fair to my specific case, MS word is a subscription-based service but google docs isn't.

                          But that last bit is also a good point. Hopefully people would get enough warning to transfer stuff over, like how we found out about Flash shutting down two years in advance
                          True, Google Docs is free to use (much like Pages from Apple) however it's expanding the size limits beyond stock I'm talking about. Google gives a generous 15GB but that may not be enough at times.

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                            #14
                            Eh, usually I only ever use online storage as a porn repository tbh. There is some really good stuff out there but it aint worth the gigs tbh I got too many SM64 speedrun videos I like to put on to fall asleep to.

                            All the shit I really care about (character ideas, novels, lore things, compositions, VN scripts, etc) takes up little enough space that I can have them all on pretty much every device I use, which is great because I am working on the text-based stuff pretty often. IA Writer lets me share all that stuff via Bluetooth so it gets updated pretty consistently, thus eliminating the need for an online backup....though i guess in theory if my house was hit by like a hurricane or whatever and i somehow survive that then it might be handy to have the things backed up on a cloud.

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