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    Originally posted by Post-Crisis Shob View Post
    Just published by the New York Times within the last hour:


    "The Times today is taking the rare step of publishing an anonymous Op-Ed essay. We have done so at the request of the author, a senior official in the Trump administration whose identity is known to us and whose job would be jeopardized by its disclosure."

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/05/o...esistance.html



    President Trump is facing a test to his presidency unlike any faced by a modern American leader.

    It’s not just that the special counsel looms large. Or that the country is bitterly divided over Mr. Trump’s leadership. Or even that his party might well lose the House to an opposition hellbent on his downfall.

    The dilemma — which he does not fully grasp — is that many of the senior officials in his own administration are working diligently from within to frustrate parts of his agenda and his worst inclinations.

    To be clear, ours is not the popular “resistance” of the left. We want the administration to succeed and think that many of its policies have already made America safer and more prosperous.

    But we believe our first duty is to this country, and the president continues to act in a manner that is detrimental to the health of our republic.

    That is why many Trump appointees have vowed to do what we can to preserve our democratic institutions while thwarting Mr. Trump’s more misguided impulses until he is out of office.

    The root of the problem is the president’s amorality. Anyone who works with him knows he is not moored to any discernible first principles that guide his decision making.

    Although he was elected as a Republican, the president shows little affinity for ideals long espoused by conservatives: free minds, free markets and free people. At best, he has invoked these ideals in scripted settings. At worst, he has attacked them outright.

    In addition to his mass-marketing of the notion that the press is the “enemy of the people,” President Trump’s impulses are generally anti-trade and anti-democratic.

    Don’t get me wrong. There are bright spots that the near-ceaseless negative coverage of the administration fails to capture: effective deregulation, historic tax reform, a more robust military and more.

    But these successes have come despite — not because of — the president’s leadership style, which is impetuous, adversarial, petty and ineffective.

    From the White House to executive branch departments and agencies, senior officials will privately admit their daily disbelief at the commander in chief’s comments and actions. Most are working to insulate their operations from his whims.

    Meetings with him veer off topic and off the rails, he engages in repetitive rants, and his impulsiveness results in half-baked, ill-informed and occasionally reckless decisions that have to be walked back.

    “There is literally no telling whether he might change his mind from one minute to the next,” a top official complained to me recently, exasperated by an Oval Office meeting at which the president flip-flopped on a major policy decision he’d made only a week earlier.

    The erratic behavior would be more concerning if it weren’t for unsung heroes in and around the White House. Some of his aides have been cast as villains by the media. But in private, they have gone to great lengths to keep bad decisions contained to the West Wing, though they are clearly not always successful.

    It may be cold comfort in this chaotic era, but Americans should know that there are adults in the room. We fully recognize what is happening. And we are trying to do what’s right even when Donald Trump won’t.

    The result is a two-track presidency.

    Take foreign policy: In public and in private, President Trump shows a preference for autocrats and dictators, such as President Vladimir Putin of Russia and North Korea’s leader, Kim Jong-un, and displays little genuine appreciation for the ties that bind us to allied, like-minded nations.

    Astute observers have noted, though, that the rest of the administration is operating on another track, one where countries like Russia are called out for meddling and punished accordingly, and where allies around the world are engaged as peers rather than ridiculed as rivals.

    On Russia, for instance, the president was reluctant to expel so many of Mr. Putin’s spies as punishment for the poisoning of a former Russian spy in Britain. He complained for weeks about senior staff members letting him get boxed into further confrontation with Russia, and he expressed frustration that the United States continued to impose sanctions on the country for its malign behavior. But his national security team knew better — such actions had to be taken, to hold Moscow accountable.

    This isn’t the work of the so-called deep state. It’s the work of the steady state.

    Given the instability many witnessed, there were early whispers within the cabinet of invoking the 25th Amendment, which would start a complex process for removing the president. But no one wanted to precipitate a constitutional crisis. So we will do what we can to steer the administration in the right direction until — one way or another — it’s over.

    The bigger concern is not what Mr. Trump has done to the presidency but rather what we as a nation have allowed him to do to us. We have sunk low with him and allowed our discourse to be stripped of civility.

    Senator John McCain put it best in his farewell letter. All Americans should heed his words and break free of the tribalism trap, with the high aim of uniting through our shared values and love of this great nation.

    We may no longer have Senator McCain. But we will always have his example — a lodestar for restoring honor to public life and our national dialogue. Mr. Trump may fear such honorable men, but we should revere them.

    There is a quiet resistance within the administration of people choosing to put country first. But the real difference will be made by everyday citizens rising above politics, reaching across the aisle and resolving to shed the labels in favor of a single one: Americans.




    "The writer is a senior official in the Trump administration."

    Wowwwwwwwwwwww.

    Trump's gonna be up late tonight trying to figure out who cucked him with that one. (Is it John Kelly? Imma take a wild guess and say John Kelly.)
    >"""anonymous source"""
    next

    Comment


      Originally posted by Doctor. View Post

      No, I mean the proof that this isn't fabricated bullshit

      I mean, Trump is a fucktard, but considering the website we're talking about lol

      ...well for what its worth, it comes a day after the contents of Bob Woodward's new book went public + Trump started throwing his his latest Never happened. Its all Fake. Fake News. tantrum.

      Obvious inference would be that one of Woodward's sources who publicly has to maintain the facade of admiration and loyalty but privately wanted nothing more than to shout. "Thats right--I said it!" wanted to undercut the president's denial.

      (In case you've never heard of Bob Woodward over Portugal--Woodward & Bernstein. Legendary investigative reporters behind the Watergate saga who broke the biggest political story of the last century. That Bob Woodward)






      Among the headlines being made with his new book, being released with citations to named sources and audio-recorded conversations:

      ___________

      1) That General Kelly regards Trump as an "unhinged idiot" who is pointless to talk to or advise, because he doesn't actually listen to anyone

      2) That Defense Secretary Mattis regards Trump as having the discipline, temperament, and critical thinking skills of a "5th or 6th grader"

      3) That lower level administration personnel routinely remove papers from the president's desk, present him with distractions, circumvent his authority, and refuse to follow his direct orders. To prevent Trump from making what everyone except Trump himself recognizes would be "disastrous" decisions on trade and foreign policy.

      4) In one instance, Trump's Chief Economic Advisor removed an Order from Trump's desk that Trump had planned on signing and executing later that day. If signed and executed, the Order would have had the United States withdraw from its trade agreement with South Korea. Trump never realized the Order was missing and forgot about it.

      5) In another instance, Trump ordered Mattis to have the United States military invade Syria, assassinate Bashar al-Assad, and "Fucking kill him. Kill the fucking lot of them." Mattis told Trump "I'll get right on that," then went back to the Pentagon and told his staff "we're not going to do any of that" + directed them not to follow the president's plan.

      6) Trump called Attorney General Jeff Sessions "mentally retarded' and a "dumb southerner," and made fun of his southern accent.

      7) Trump ordered his generals to draft plans for a unilateral, preemptive attack on North Korea ahead of his meeting with Kim-Jung Un. Mattis had to explain to him that the reason they weren't doing this was because they were trying not to start World War 3.

      8) On or around January 27, 2018, Trump's aides tried to prep him for a sit-down interview with Mueller. Trump was unable to get through the first 30 minutes of the practice interview without melting down, lying, and cursing out the aides telling him that if this were a real interview he would have just perjured himself + calling the whole thing a "god-damn hoax."

      9) Trump's personal attorney described Trump's behavior during the practice interview as that of an "aggrieved Shakespearean King" and the prospect of Trump actually testifying under oath in the Mueller investigation for real as a "nightmare."

      10) Trump, however, seemed completely unaware that he had failed the practice interview. He expressed disbelief that his attorneys thought he had "struggled" with the questioning. And insisted that he was fully prepared to testify under oath + clear his name.

      11) Attorney John Dowd called Trump a "fucking liar," and told him that if he went before Mueller and testified under oath he would wind up wearing "an orange jumpsuit."

      12) Dowd conveyed what transpired during the mock interview to Mueller, and told Mueller he would not allow Trump to do a sit-down interview under oath because he did not believe Trump was capable of getting through the interview without perjuring himself.

      13) In a strategy meeting on Afghanistan, Trump told his generals: "You should be killing guys. You don't need a strategy to be killing people."

      14) There was another strategy meeting on Korea where his advisors asked him what assets he would need in the region to rest easy, knowing that the US was going into talks with Kim-Jung Un from a position of strength. Trump said: "I wouldn't need a fucking thing, and I'd sleep like a baby" then left the meeting. (this was reportedly back when Rex Tillerson was in the cabinet and present during strategy meetings, and it was reportedly after this meeting that Tillerson called Trump a "fucking moron." That was the contact for the remark that got Tilleson fired from his Cabinet post)

      15) Gary Cohn--one of Trump's Jewish advisors--attempted to resign after Trump's handling of the Nazi march on Charlottseville. Trump refused to accept the resignation and accused Cohn of committing "treason." General Kelly then told Cohn that he should have taken his letter of resignation and "shoved it up his ass six different times."

      16) Trump himself told Woodward that he believed he was the greatest president of all time, and that writing anything less of time in office would be "inaccurate." "Accurate is that nobody's ever done a better job than I'm doing as president," Trump told the veteran journalist on-the-record.

      17) When Trump was caught on the now infamous "Grab em by the Pussy!" tape and absolutely no one would appear on TV to defend his boasts of getting away with sexual assault, except Rudy Giuliani, Trump called Giuliani after Giuliani's televised defense of "Grab em by the Pussy!" and told Giuliani: "Rudy. You're a baby. I've never seen a worse defense of me in my life. They took your diaper off right there. You're like a little baby that needed to be changed. When are you going to be a man?"
      _____

      ^^^
      Op-ed is not being released in a vacuum here.


      Last edited by Post-Crisis Shob; September 5th, 2018, 04:27 PM.

      Comment


        Originally posted by Post-Crisis Shob View Post
        Just published by the New York Times within the last hour:


        "The Times today is taking the rare step of publishing an anonymous Op-Ed essay. We have done so at the request of the author, a senior official in the Trump administration whose identity is known to us and whose job would be jeopardized by its disclosure."

        https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/05/o...esistance.html



        President Trump is facing a test to his presidency unlike any faced by a modern American leader.

        It’s not just that the special counsel looms large. Or that the country is bitterly divided over Mr. Trump’s leadership. Or even that his party might well lose the House to an opposition hellbent on his downfall.

        The dilemma — which he does not fully grasp — is that many of the senior officials in his own administration are working diligently from within to frustrate parts of his agenda and his worst inclinations.

        To be clear, ours is not the popular “resistance” of the left. We want the administration to succeed and think that many of its policies have already made America safer and more prosperous.

        But we believe our first duty is to this country, and the president continues to act in a manner that is detrimental to the health of our republic.

        That is why many Trump appointees have vowed to do what we can to preserve our democratic institutions while thwarting Mr. Trump’s more misguided impulses until he is out of office.

        The root of the problem is the president’s amorality. Anyone who works with him knows he is not moored to any discernible first principles that guide his decision making.

        Although he was elected as a Republican, the president shows little affinity for ideals long espoused by conservatives: free minds, free markets and free people. At best, he has invoked these ideals in scripted settings. At worst, he has attacked them outright.

        In addition to his mass-marketing of the notion that the press is the “enemy of the people,” President Trump’s impulses are generally anti-trade and anti-democratic.

        Don’t get me wrong. There are bright spots that the near-ceaseless negative coverage of the administration fails to capture: effective deregulation, historic tax reform, a more robust military and more.

        But these successes have come despite — not because of — the president’s leadership style, which is impetuous, adversarial, petty and ineffective.

        From the White House to executive branch departments and agencies, senior officials will privately admit their daily disbelief at the commander in chief’s comments and actions. Most are working to insulate their operations from his whims.

        Meetings with him veer off topic and off the rails, he engages in repetitive rants, and his impulsiveness results in half-baked, ill-informed and occasionally reckless decisions that have to be walked back.

        “There is literally no telling whether he might change his mind from one minute to the next,” a top official complained to me recently, exasperated by an Oval Office meeting at which the president flip-flopped on a major policy decision he’d made only a week earlier.

        The erratic behavior would be more concerning if it weren’t for unsung heroes in and around the White House. Some of his aides have been cast as villains by the media. But in private, they have gone to great lengths to keep bad decisions contained to the West Wing, though they are clearly not always successful.

        It may be cold comfort in this chaotic era, but Americans should know that there are adults in the room. We fully recognize what is happening. And we are trying to do what’s right even when Donald Trump won’t.

        The result is a two-track presidency.

        Take foreign policy: In public and in private, President Trump shows a preference for autocrats and dictators, such as President Vladimir Putin of Russia and North Korea’s leader, Kim Jong-un, and displays little genuine appreciation for the ties that bind us to allied, like-minded nations.

        Astute observers have noted, though, that the rest of the administration is operating on another track, one where countries like Russia are called out for meddling and punished accordingly, and where allies around the world are engaged as peers rather than ridiculed as rivals.

        On Russia, for instance, the president was reluctant to expel so many of Mr. Putin’s spies as punishment for the poisoning of a former Russian spy in Britain. He complained for weeks about senior staff members letting him get boxed into further confrontation with Russia, and he expressed frustration that the United States continued to impose sanctions on the country for its malign behavior. But his national security team knew better — such actions had to be taken, to hold Moscow accountable.

        This isn’t the work of the so-called deep state. It’s the work of the steady state.

        Given the instability many witnessed, there were early whispers within the cabinet of invoking the 25th Amendment, which would start a complex process for removing the president. But no one wanted to precipitate a constitutional crisis. So we will do what we can to steer the administration in the right direction until — one way or another — it’s over.

        The bigger concern is not what Mr. Trump has done to the presidency but rather what we as a nation have allowed him to do to us. We have sunk low with him and allowed our discourse to be stripped of civility.

        Senator John McCain put it best in his farewell letter. All Americans should heed his words and break free of the tribalism trap, with the high aim of uniting through our shared values and love of this great nation.

        We may no longer have Senator McCain. But we will always have his example — a lodestar for restoring honor to public life and our national dialogue. Mr. Trump may fear such honorable men, but we should revere them.

        There is a quiet resistance within the administration of people choosing to put country first. But the real difference will be made by everyday citizens rising above politics, reaching across the aisle and resolving to shed the labels in favor of a single one: Americans.




        "The writer is a senior official in the Trump administration."

        Wowwwwwwwwwwww.

        Trump's gonna be up late tonight trying to figure out who cucked him with that one. (Is it John Kelly? Imma take a wild guess and say John Kelly.)

        This is nice and all but I really wish they did something more. When Jeff Sessions comes out looking like the good guy for holding strong to his integrity and not letting the DOJ fall prey to Trump's partisanship whims, we got some serious problems here. We are talking about the guy who thinks smoking pot is on par with cocaine and meth looking like the sane person.

        It feels like everyone is thinking it, but no one is saying it or doing anything about it. I would really love if White house staff just started walking out. One by one, they left. They said fuck it and quit. I care not for the crisis, how bad it'll look on the country, etc etc. Congress will have to finally step up and do its fucking job and get that fuckface out of the White House.

        Comment


          Originally posted by Post-Crisis Shob View Post
          3) That lower level administration personnel routinely remove papers from the president's desk, present him with distractions, circumvent his authority, and refuse to follow his direct orders. To prevent Trump from making what everyone except Trump himself recognizes would be "disastrous" decisions on trade and foreign policy.

          4) In one instance, Trump's Chief Economic Advisor removed an Order from Trump's desk that Trump had planned on signing and executing later that day. If signed and executed, the Order would have had the United States withdraw from its trade agreement with South Korea. Trump never realized the Order was missing and forgot about it.

          5) In another instance, Trump ordered Mattis to have the United States military invade Syria, assassinate Bashar al-Assad, and "Fucking kill him. Kill the fucking lot of them." Mattis told Trump "I'll get right on that," then went back to the Pentagon and told his staff "we're not going to do any of that" + directed them not to follow the president's plan.

          7) Trump ordered his generals to draft plans for a unilateral, preemptive attack on North Korea ahead of his meeting with Kim-Jung Un. Mattis had to explain to him that the reason they weren't doing this was because they were trying not to start World War 3.

          12) Dowd conveyed what transpired during the mock interview to Mueller, and told Mueller he would not allow Trump to do a sit-down interview under oath because he did not believe Trump was capable of getting through the interview without perjuring himself.

          16) Trump himself told Woodward that he believed he was the greatest president of all time, and that writing anything less of time in office would be "inaccurate." "Accurate is that nobody's ever done a better job than I'm doing as president," Trump told the veteran journalist on-the-record.
          Goddamn amazing. Absolutely, fucking amazing.

          Comment


            Originally posted by Kajin_Style View Post
            When Jeff Sessions comes out looking like the good guy... we got some serious problems here.


            God bless Alabama.

            Comment


              never thought id see the day where the mexican presidency looked more legitimate than the us one

              jesus fucking christ lmao, what a mess. even i didnt anticipate Trump being this awful.

              Comment


                Originally posted by Helly View Post
                never thought id see the day where the mexican presidency looked more legitimate than the us one

                jesus fucking christ lmao, what a mess. even i didnt anticipate Trump being this awful.

                Comment


                  Originally posted by Kajin_Style View Post

                  It feels like everyone is thinking it, but no one is saying it or doing anything about it. I would really love if White house staff just started walking out. One by one, they left. They said fuck it and quit. I care not for the crisis, how bad it'll look on the country, etc etc. Congress will have to finally step up and do its fucking job and get that fuckface out of the White House.
                  The problem with that is that they NEED to keep filtering Truck's stupidity as much as possible. If they leave, he gets to appoint a lot more people to the White House, and you can bet those people will be based on who loves him the most.

                  Oh, and that's still not a guarantee that Congress will start the impeachment process. In fact, I doubt that'd ever work.
                  Last edited by OrganizationXV; September 6th, 2018, 08:17 AM.
                  Originally posted by Wade
                  Everything is hidden in plain sight, like in Men in Black. We've all just been neuralized to think it is "normal".

                  Comment




                    I'm just going to post this absolutely everywhere I can think of.

                    Comment


                      But does that quote really beat out
                      ?

                      He has so many terrible quotes, I guess it's hard to pick a worst one.
                      Originally posted by Wade
                      Everything is hidden in plain sight, like in Men in Black. We've all just been neuralized to think it is "normal".

                      Comment


                        Originally posted by OrganizationXV View Post
                        But does that quote really beat out
                        ?

                        He has so many terrible quotes, I guess it's hard to pick a worst one.
                        I just really like the one where he blatantly disregards the first amendment of the constitution, y'know, the same amendment that republicans love to shriek about every time they say something particularly awful.
                        Last edited by Cid; September 7th, 2018, 03:37 PM.

                        Comment


                          This cannot be a real human being; at this point, he has to be trolling for some preposterous reason or to some inconceivable end.

                          Comment




                            Amazing

                            Comment


                            • P408370R
                              P408370R commented
                              Editing a comment
                              lol

                            • Kajin_Style
                              Kajin_Style commented
                              Editing a comment
                              OMG EVERYTHING IS A LIE NOTHING IS REAL ANYMORE!!!! AHHH!! --- /s

                            >Jeff Sessions might well be the extremely unlikely """hero""" who finally fells Trump

                            kms

                            Comment


                              Originally posted by Kajin_Style View Post


                              This is nice and all but I really wish they did something more. When Jeff Sessions comes out looking like the good guy for holding strong to his integrity and not letting the DOJ fall prey to Trump's partisanship whims, we got some serious problems here. We are talking about the guy who thinks smoking pot is on par with cocaine and meth looking like the sane person.

                              It feels like everyone is thinking it, but no one is saying it or doing anything about it. I would really love if White house staff just started walking out. One by one, they left. They said fuck it and quit. I care not for the crisis, how bad it'll look on the country, etc etc. Congress will have to finally step up and do its fucking job and get that fuckface out of the White House.
                              There's are conservative republicans we're talking about. As much as they might hate trump's childishness or total lack of principle, they love his more traditional things he's doing,like being tough on immigration,tax cuts,judges etc.

                              They're not just gonna walk away from everything they've been dreaming of.

                              Also I bet it was Sessions that wrote the Op-Ed.
                              ​​​

                              Comment


                              • Kajin_Style
                                Kajin_Style commented
                                Editing a comment
                                oh shit I didn't even consider Sessions!




                              Post-Crisis Shob I thought you'd appreciate these quality FB posts from my former pastor.

                              Comment


                                Obama is back BAAABYYY!!~~

                                No seriously. He gave a speech today and was roasting Trump and the republicans. Here's source: https://www.vox.com/policy-and-polit...ois-transcript

                                And some snippets:


                                Of course, there’s always been another darker aspect to America’s story. Progress doesn’t just move in a straight line. There’s a reason why progress hasn’t been easy and why throughout our history every two steps forward seems to sometimes produce one step back. Each time we painstakingly pull ourselves closer to our founding ideals, that all of us are created equal, endowed by our Creator with certain inalienable rights, the ideals that say every child should have opportunity and every man and woman in this country who’s willing to work hard should be able to find a job and support a family and pursue their small peace of the American dream, ideals that say we have a collective responsibility to care for the sick and the and we have a responsibility to conserve the amazing bounty, the natural resources of this country and of this planet for future generations — each time we’ve gotten closer to those ideals, somebody somewhere has pushed back.


                                It did not start with Donald Trump. He is a symptom, not the cause. He’s just capitalizing on resentments that politicians have been fanning for years, a fear and anger that’s rooted in our past but it’s also born out of the enormous upheavals that have taken place in your brief lifetimes.

                                -----------

                                Most of you don’t remember a time before 9/11, when you didn’t have to take off your shoes at an airport. Most of you don’t remember a time when America wasn’t at war or when money and images and information could travel instantly around the globe. Or when the climate wasn’t changing faster than our efforts to address it.


                                -----------

                                But over the past few decades, the politics of division and resentment and paranoia has unfortunately found a home in the Republican party. This Congress has championed the unwinding of campaign finance laws to give billionaires outside influence over our politics. Systematically attacked voting rights to make it harder for young people and minorities and the poor to vote. Handed out tax cuts without regard to deficits. Slashed the safety net wherever it could, cast dozens of votes to take away health insurance from ordinary Americans, embraced wild conspiracy theories like those surrounding Benghazi or my birth certificate, rejected science, rejected facts on things like climate change, embraced a rising absolutism from a willingness to default on America’s debt by not paying our bills to a refusal to even meet much less consider a qualified nominee for the supreme court because he happened to be nominated by a Democratic president.

                                -----------

                                So with Republicans in control of Congress and the White House, without any checks or balances whatsoever, they’ve provided another $1.5 trillion in tax cuts to people like me who I promise don’t need it and don’t even pretend to pay for them. It’s supposed to be the party supposedly of fiscal conservatism. Suddenly deficits do not matter. Even though just two years ago when the deficit was lower, they said I couldn’t afford to help working families or seniors on medicare because the deficit was in existential crisis. What changed? What changed?


                                -----------

                                They’re subsidizing corporate polluters with taxpayer dollars, allowing dishonest lenders to take advantage of veterans and consumers and students again. They’ve made it so that the only nation on Earth to pull out of the global climate agreement, it’s not North Korea, it’s not Syria, it’s not Russia or Saudi Arabia, it’s us. The only country. There are a lot of countries in the world. We’re the only ones.

                                -----------

                                They’re undermining our alliances, cozying up to Russia. What happened to the Republican party? Its central organizing principle in foreign policy was the fight against communism, and now they’re cozying up to the former head of the KGB.


                                -----------

                                And by the way, the claim that everything will turn out okay because there are people inside the White House who secretly aren’t following the president’s orders, that is not a check. I’m being serious here. That’s not how our democracy’s supposed to work. These people aren’t elected. They’re not accountable. They’re not doing us a service by actively promoting 90% of the crazy stuff that’s coming out of this white house, and then saying, don’t worry, we’re preventing the other 10%.

                                That’s not how things are supposed to work. This is not normal. These are extraordinary times. And they’re dangerous times.


                                -----------

                                We can’t just put walls up all around America. Walls don’t keep out threats like terrorism or disease. And that’s why we propose leading our alliances and helping other countries develop and pushing back against tyrants.


                                -----------

                                But I am here to tell you that even if you don’t agree with me or Democrats on policy, even if you believe in more libertarian economic theories, even if you are an evangelical and our position on certain social issues is a bridge too far, even if you think my assessment of immigration is mistaken and the Democrats aren’t serious enough about immigration enforcement, I’m here to tell you that you should still be concerned with our current course and should still want to see a restoration of honesty and decency and lawfulness in our government.

                                It should not be Democratic or Republican. It should not be a partisan issue to say that we do not pressure the attorney general or the FBI to use the criminal justice system as a cudgel to punish our political opponents. Or to explicitly call on the attorney general to protect members of our own party from prosecution because an election happens to be coming up. I’m not making that up. That’s not hypothetical.



                                -----------

                                It shouldn’t be Democratic or Republican to say that we don’t threaten the freedom of the press because they say things or publish stories we don’t like. I complained plenty about Fox News, but you never heard me threaten to shut them down or call them enemies of the people. It shouldn’t be democratic or Republican to say we don’t target certain groups of people based on what they look like or how they pray.


                                -----------

                                We are Americans. We’re supposed to stand up to bullies. Not follow them. We’re supposed to stand up to discrimination, and we’re sure as heck supposed to stand up clearly and unequivocally to Nazi sympathizers. How hard can that be? Saying that Nazis are bad.

                                -----------

                                You don’t need an effective government or a robust press or reasoned debate to work when all you’re concerned about is maintaining power. In fact, the more cynical people are about government, the angrier and more dispirited they are about the prospects for change, the more likely the powerful are able to maintain their power.


                                -----------

                                Maybe it’s not fashionable to say that right now. It’s hard to see it with all the nonsense in Washington. It’s hard to hear it with all the noise. But common ground exists. I have seen it. I have lived it. I know there are white people who care deeply about black people being treated unfairly. I have talked to them and loved them, and I know there are black people who care deeply about the struggles of white rural I’m one of them. And I have a track record to prove it. I know there are evangelicals who are deeply committed to doing something about climate change. I’ve seen them do the work.


                                -----------

                                If you’re tired of politicians who offer nothing but thoughts and prayers after a mass shooting, you’ve got to do what the parkland kids are doing. Some of them aren’t even eligible to vote yet. They’re out there working to change minds and registering people. And they’re not giving up until we have a Congress that sees your lives as more important than a campaign check from the you’ve got to vote.

                                -----------

                                We have been through much darker times than these. And somehow each generation of Americans carried us through to the other side. Not by sitting around and waiting for something to happen, not by leaving it to others to do something, but by leading that movement for change themselves. And if you do that, if you get involved and you get engaged and you knock on some doors and you talk with your friends and you argue with your family members and you change some minds and you vote, something powerful happens. Change happens. Hope happens. Not perfection, not every bit of cruelty and sadness and poverty and disease suddenly stricken from the Earth. There will still be problems, but with each new candidate that surprises you with a victory that you supported, a spark of hope happens.

                                With each new law that helps a kid read or helps a homeless family find shelter or helps a veteran get the support he or she has earned, each time that happens hope happens. With each new step we take in the direction of fairness and justice and equality and opportunity, hope spreads. And that can be the legacy of your generation.

                                -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------




                                This is not everything mind you but a lot of really good chunks I had to share. God... How a missed having a president that can spell, made sense, be civil and even be patriotic.

                                Comment


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                                      Originally posted by Timeless Writer View Post
                                      you do know that is a misleading title right?

                                      The U3 unemployment is garbage to gauge an economy on, as shown by: this explenation

                                      And furthermore even then, we're not any better off than we were in the early 2000's before the recession started:shown here

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