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    Originally posted by Chara View Post

    That's pretty awesome dude. It sucks that only rich people get access to sweet technology though. If I had some better tech I could probably do some cool stuff myself

    And yeah, lol it's not for everyone. I love coffee too tho
    Hey, a fellow coffee lover.

    You know, I think I'll actually post my full-blown annotated bib here. It could probably be improved in terms of what it's supposed to be doing...but it has cited sources and long annotations discussing the subject of quantum computers fairly at-length, benefits and risks. And of course, if my actual annotations are shit, you can access the articles online since they're all accessible (I would suggest Google Scholar and this place in regards to looking up these types of articles, most of them are not from stuff like Verge). I can also just link this post if I want someone else to get an understanding of the capabilities we're talking about here.

    Soooooooo...

    Crack at it. Anyone else can too.



    Arute, F., Arya, K., Babbush, R. et al. Quantum supremacy using a programmable superconducting processor. Nature 574, 505–510 (2019) doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1666-5

    Scientists in the R&D department of Google created a quantum computer that was able to compute a problem in 200 seconds whereas a classical equivalent would take 10,000 years to compute the problem. Illustrates how quantum computers accelerate normal computational procedures and could use algorithms to solve problems modern computers can’t. In addition, the article outlined how the quantum computer would be able to increase in power at a faster rate per doubling of volume than a classical computer could, implying a new form of Moore’s Law but for quantum computers instead. The article uses mathematics and data tables from experimental results to illustrate the computing power of quantum computers. The article covers the technicalities of the specific problem tackled by the quantum computer along with the fundamentals of the quantum computer architecture, such as the errors that occur in quantum computers and how that will need to be further addressed in later models. It is intriguing, especially the implications that it can jump ahead of classical computers so ridiculously quickly. What will it mean for malicious uses of quantum technology as much as well-intended ones, and could well-intended ones even cause a mess with quantum technology so astronomically ahead of classical technology?

    B. P. Lanyon, J. D. Whitfield, G. G. Gillett, M. E. Goggin, M. P. Almeida, I. Kassal, . . . A. G. White. (2010). Towards quantum chemistry on a quantum computer. Nature Chemistry, 2(2), 106-10611.

    Several computer scientists and chemists found that quantum computer algorithms are much more precise than classical algorithms in analyzing experimental data involving systems of molecules. The precision demanded of experimental results becomes harder to obtain the larger the set of molecules is, meaning that only the smallest and tiniest systems of molecules can be analyzed by classical computers with the precision required, whereas quantum computers could analyze much larger sets of molecules. The article is heavy on the mathematics and technical details, but the basic gist is easy to understand. It’s interesting to see how quantum computers could be used to increase the development of chemistry by increasing the precision of findings and thus understanding of chemical systems and could be used in areas like Biochemistry. Possibly, the results could lead to mapping all sorts of organic structures at a molecular level, and so we could likely accelerate research into genetics and manipulation of organic material for our benefit. However, it could possibly be used to modify genetic material for more ambiguous or malicious ends; for example, militaries seeking to integrate such valuable technology for their own ends.

    Bravyi, S., Gosset, D., & König, R. (2018). Quantum advantage with shallow circuits. Science (New York, N.Y.), 362(6412), 308-311.

    Several computer scientists conducted a small experiment that determined that a quantum circuit supersedes that of an equivalent classical circuit, showing how quantum computers can accelerate computer processing power. The article used mathematics and experiments to explore quantum circuits and classical circuits in comparison to each other. While the classical computer required a logarithmic depth of iterations, the quantum computer required an iterative depth of constant time. This means that at least some problems that would have a variation in time to completion would simply be done in the same time, every time, with an equivalent quantum computer. This would not always be the case, as eventually at some point the depth of iterations will be variable of some sort the larger the depth goes (such as a quadratic depth). I would imagine that for dealing with big data (iCloud, Google Drive, and other similar applications), this would be an immense advantage, as we are having issues processing with the amount of data that people are generating on a daily basis, which quickly adds up over time.

    Dorothy E. Denning. (2019). Is Quantum Computing a Cybersecurity Threat? American Scientist, 107(2), doi:10.1511/2019.107.2.83

    A researcher for computer science cybersecurity measures wrote an article discussing quantum computers’ capabilities and limitations in breaking certain cryptographic codes. The straightforward way of breaking such encryptions with a digital computer is to try every combination until one finally works, bitwise, which becomes exponentially harder as the number of bits increases. Doubling the length of code would drastically increase the effort needed to brute force through it. The Quantum Computer is immediately at a theoretical advantage, as it can brute force a solution for 128-bit strings with the efficiency of a classical computer handling 64-bit codes. However, the length of the codes can be easily increased. With public keys, however, things change. Public keys are what are used by the average consumer in their daily actions and include common applications, communications and data storage. Examples include RSA encryption, which uses algorithms to create the public keys that map to the private ones, a quantum computer could theoretically crack 4096-bit public key in a few hours, where 2048-bit public keys are long by encryption standards. The author proposes investing in quantum-resistant cryptography as soon as possible, as even though current quantum computers are too small and error-prone to succeed, that might not last. The U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology, for example, is analyzing 69 methods to see which ones are resistant to quantum hacking.

    Hemmer, P., & Wrachtrup, J. (2009). Physics. Where is my quantum computer? Science (New York, N.Y.), 324(5926), 473-474.

    Several computer scientists discuss and analyze the results of experiments involving simple quantum circuits that outdid equivalent classical circuits in small scale experiments, showing promise as far back as 2009 for quantum computing to outdo classical computers. Specifically, the article explores quantum entanglement, where atoms at a distance can influence each other through quantum properties, creating an unbreakable cipher, and a tripwire for any would-be hackers trying to get a peek in, presenting at least some sort of improvement for cybersecurity measures through quantum physics, which could potentially counter quantum computers’ potential to hack communications, and open other avenues for countering code-cracking capabilities as they develop. In addition, it explores the possibilities of using small amounts of qubits for various tasks, such as qubits in a diamond medium that could be used as small probes in living cells, quantum imaging to produce high-resolution images, and atomic clocks that could measure relativistic effects.

    Marcos Lopez de Prado. Singularity University Summits. (2016). Quantum Computing Exponential Finance [online video]. Available from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kU7vk9jmQC8

    A professor with research in quantum computing discusses how quantum computing could be used to create nearly perfectly financial models of reality by simulating the inherent randomness of reality. Classical computers can’t model reality as it is very well without very, very large computers because reality is something like multiple problems with solutions happening all at once, and constantly changing. Because reality is dynamic, it requires the ability to solve them all simultaneously to get the best prediction. Normal computer processing units are linear, which means they can’t really handle multiple problems at once unless you have multiple processing units. Parallelism is the concept of taking a problem, splitting it up into pieces, and solving each tiny part individually to reach a solution at the end. Classical computers cannot do this easily, whereas quantum computers are much more suited to the task, able to do it with a single processing unit. In effect, this means that quantum computers could predict the future at a level where you could confidently say, given the existing variables (whatever the variables are), this is where things are heading. Normal computers couldn’t predict or model the financial crash of 2008. Quantum computers, on the other hand, if they became refined enough, could. With such a level of knowledge of the economy, economics could be revolutionized, with the ability to make decisions to confidently avoid disastrous outcomes. On the other hand, it could give malicious actors the information they need to model how they’ll make decisions to everyone’s detriment if they so choose to.

    Lloyd, S., Mohseni, M., & Rebentrost, P. (2014). Quantum principal component analysis. Nature Physics, 10(9), 631-633.

    Computer scientists mathematically work out how a quantum algorithm compares to a computer algorithm in handling matrices of varying dimensions. They find that computing the eigenvectors from the eigenvalues of the matrices is exponentially faster with quantum computers than classical computers, handling the procedure in logarithmic time compared to the linear time for a classical computer. Because of this, quantum algorithms would be able to drastically speed up machine learning, allowing machine learning to be applied to larger data sets. Fundamentally, this means that machine-learning used for pattern recognition to tailor its functions to becomes far better. Machine learning is already used in applications like search engines to tailor the results to the individual habits of users. Quantum computers could do this task much better. Theoretically, human behavior could be mapped and predicted by computers far more effectively in general, which could be used in various ways. It could be used to predict customer behaviors more, but it could be used as part of preventative measures. If you had enough data of the right type, you could predict negative behaviors more effectively and thus use it to better prevent people from spiraling into negative behavior patterns where you can apply such computational methods.

    Martinez, E. A., Muschik, C. A., Schindler, P., Nigg, D., Erhard, A., Heyl, M., ... & Blatt, R. (2016). Real-time dynamics of lattice gauge theories with a few-qubit quantum computer. Nature, 534(7608), 516.

    Researchers in particle physics created a small quantum computer that modeled particle structures at the quantum level. The particles under consideration were electron-positron pairs that are produced in a vacuum due to quantum fluctuations. Whereas classical computers cannot do so very accurately, the quantum computer did, and the experimental results agreed with the theoretical models that the researchers went into the experiment with. In other words, quantum computers grant us the ability to effectively observe quantum mechanics and atomic physics in real-time with certainty, whereas we could only really guess with classical computers. Because of this, researchers in Physics can conduct far more accurate experiments on subject matters in particle physics, drastically increasing the rate at which we further understand the fundamental building blocks of the universe with certainty. Theoretically, confirming or denying assertations about particles or types of particles under consideration could be accelerated. For example, the Higgs-Boson required the large Hadron Collider and a supercomputer to discover. With quantum computers, this process could be optimized further. At the very least, the supercomputer part of such contraptions could be significantly improved.

    O’Malley, P. J., Babbush, R., Kivlichan, I. D., Romero, J., McClean, J. R., Barends, R., ... & Campbell, B. (2016). Scalable quantum simulation of molecular energies. Physical Review X, 6(3), 031007.

    A large group of chemists and computer scientists created and used a quantum computer that could simulate molecular energies, whereas normal computers have trouble doing so or cannot model these molecular energies. The researchers computed the energy surface of molecular hydrogen very accurately and used it to correctly predict a specific energy result (dissociation energy). It was strictly limited to a small scale (a few atoms at most), but the implications are immense. Scientists would be able to precisely calculate the rates of chemical reactions and enable the designing of new materials by just strictly using computers and lessen the need for labs in the research of new materials. Theoretically, you could create new chemical compounds and materials for a variety of applications just using a high-tech computer. For example, structural materials, like carbon nanotubes, could be designed after a session of computer simulations and analyzations of those computer simulations. Such advancements would drastically accelerate material research and allow us to create materials with a depth of understanding we have never had before. Nanotechnology would benefit from this the most, as it deals with the lowest levels of chemical structures just above the quantum level, which these computers can accurately model.

    Robert E. Campbell Sr. (2019). Evaluation of Post-Quantum Distributed Ledger Cryptography. The Journal of The British Blockchain Association, 2(1), 1-8.

    Robert E. Campbell, a researcher and university professor, explores possible cryptographic methods (such as “qTESLA”) to improve cybersecurity measures before quantum computers become more efficient and can crack existing cybersecurity measures. In particular, he stresses creating cryptography measures that resist both classical hacking methods and quantum hacking methods, which makes sense because you don’t want encryptions that can be easily cracked by one of two methods. He emphasizes that the rate of progress on research in the field of quantum computing is an unknown and the exact date that quantum computers can take out existing cryptography measures is also unknown, so he believes it is important to start working on cybersecurity measures resistant to quantum computer hacking now. The method he explores, qTESLA, satisfies the criteria of being resistant to predicted quantum computer hacking capabilities, but is troublesome in terms of size relative to existing classical computers and has hope that the method can be further refined to overcome this issue. Overall, I think the article is important for gaining an idea of the cybersecurity risks now and later, and what circumstances are involved that contribute to those risks. In particular, the relationship between private sectors, organizations, and the government when it comes to cybersecurity measures. Will all of those sectors be able to coordinate to prepare for fault-tolerant quantum computers (quantum computers that don’t bug out too much to the point of impracticality)?

    Solenov, D., Brieler, J., & Scherrer, J. (2018). The Potential of Quantum Computing and Machine Learning to Advance Clinical Research and Change the Practice of Medicine. Missouri Medicine, 115(5), 463-467.

    Physicists and medical doctors discuss how Quantum Computers could be used in the medical field to examine patients and how to use that information to adapt medical practices, in addition to how quantum computing could assist in medical technology as it applies to directly curing patients. For example, the article discusses how quantum computers, with their ability to process vast amounts of data, could theoretically create a hyper-individualized health care system, where all the little quirks of a patient’s case can be used to come up with the closest thing to a perfect prognosis. Any variety of individual conditions and circumstances you have would also be recorded in a database, accessible by quantum algorithms to help determine conclusions. In addition, it could be used for ultra-precise imaging. For example, because the quantum computer can deal with more variables than an equivalent classical computer, its results will be far more precise, and so you can use that precision in eliminating cancer cells without affecting healthy cells. Overall, it’s impressive just how much quantum computing could advance the medical field, and just in the area of understanding individual patients at a molecular level. Quantum computing could be used to help implement nanotechnology in cures. For example, if someone has a particular disorder or condition at the cellular level, then probes created with specifications in line with the patient’s individual circumstances could target the source of the disorder.


    Last edited by RussianCoffeeAddict; November 23rd, 2019, 10:16 PM.

    Comment


      Originally posted by RussianCoffeeAddict View Post

      Hey, a fellow coffee lover.

      You know, I think I'll actually post my full-blown annotated bib here. It could probably be improved in terms of what it's supposed to be doing...but it has cited sources and long annotations discussing the subject of quantum computers fairly at-length, benefits and risks. And of course, if my actual annotations are shit, you can access the articles online since they're all accessible (I would suggest Google Scholar and this place in regards to looking up these types of articles, most of them are not from stuff like Verge). I can also just link this post if I want someone else to get an understanding of the capabilities we're talking about here.

      Soooooooo...

      Crack at it. Anyone else can too.



      Arute, F., Arya, K., Babbush, R. et al. Quantum supremacy using a programmable superconducting processor. Nature 574, 505–510 (2019) doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1666-5

      Scientists in the R&D department of Google created a quantum computer that was able to compute a problem in 200 seconds whereas a classical equivalent would take 10,000 years to compute the problem. Illustrates how quantum computers accelerate normal computational procedures and could use algorithms to solve problems modern computers can’t. In addition, the article outlined how the quantum computer would be able to increase in power at a faster rate per doubling of volume than a classical computer could, implying a new form of Moore’s Law but for quantum computers instead. The article uses mathematics and data tables from experimental results to illustrate the computing power of quantum computers. The article covers the technicalities of the specific problem tackled by the quantum computer along with the fundamentals of the quantum computer architecture, such as the errors that occur in quantum computers and how that will need to be further addressed in later models. It is intriguing, especially the implications that it can jump ahead of classical computers so ridiculously quickly. What will it mean for malicious uses of quantum technology as much as well-intended ones, and could well-intended ones even cause a mess with quantum technology so astronomically ahead of classical technology?

      B. P. Lanyon, J. D. Whitfield, G. G. Gillett, M. E. Goggin, M. P. Almeida, I. Kassal, . . . A. G. White. (2010). Towards quantum chemistry on a quantum computer. Nature Chemistry, 2(2), 106-10611.

      Several computer scientists and chemists found that quantum computer algorithms are much more precise than classical algorithms in analyzing experimental data involving systems of molecules. The precision demanded of experimental results becomes harder to obtain the larger the set of molecules is, meaning that only the smallest and tiniest systems of molecules can be analyzed by classical computers with the precision required, whereas quantum computers could analyze much larger sets of molecules. The article is heavy on the mathematics and technical details, but the basic gist is easy to understand. It’s interesting to see how quantum computers could be used to increase the development of chemistry by increasing the precision of findings and thus understanding of chemical systems and could be used in areas like Biochemistry. Possibly, the results could lead to mapping all sorts of organic structures at a molecular level, and so we could likely accelerate research into genetics and manipulation of organic material for our benefit. However, it could possibly be used to modify genetic material for more ambiguous or malicious ends; for example, militaries seeking to integrate such valuable technology for their own ends.

      Bravyi, S., Gosset, D., & König, R. (2018). Quantum advantage with shallow circuits. Science (New York, N.Y.), 362(6412), 308-311.

      Several computer scientists conducted a small experiment that determined that a quantum circuit supersedes that of an equivalent classical circuit, showing how quantum computers can accelerate computer processing power. The article used mathematics and experiments to explore quantum circuits and classical circuits in comparison to each other. While the classical computer required a logarithmic depth of iterations, the quantum computer required an iterative depth of constant time. This means that at least some problems that would have a variation in time to completion would simply be done in the same time, every time, with an equivalent quantum computer. This would not always be the case, as eventually at some point the depth of iterations will be variable of some sort the larger the depth goes (such as a quadratic depth). I would imagine that for dealing with big data (iCloud, Google Drive, and other similar applications), this would be an immense advantage, as we are having issues processing with the amount of data that people are generating on a daily basis, which quickly adds up over time.

      Dorothy E. Denning. (2019). Is Quantum Computing a Cybersecurity Threat? American Scientist, 107(2), doi:10.1511/2019.107.2.83

      A researcher for computer science cybersecurity measures wrote an article discussing quantum computers’ capabilities and limitations in breaking certain cryptographic codes. The straightforward way of breaking such encryptions with a digital computer is to try every combination until one finally works, bitwise, which becomes exponentially harder as the number of bits increases. Doubling the length of code would drastically increase the effort needed to brute force through it. The Quantum Computer is immediately at a theoretical advantage, as it can brute force a solution for 128-bit strings with the efficiency of a classical computer handling 64-bit codes. However, the length of the codes can be easily increased. With public keys, however, things change. Public keys are what are used by the average consumer in their daily actions and include common applications, communications and data storage. Examples include RSA encryption, which uses algorithms to create the public keys that map to the private ones, a quantum computer could theoretically crack 4096-bit public key in a few hours, where 2048-bit public keys are long by encryption standards. The author proposes investing in quantum-resistant cryptography as soon as possible, as even though current quantum computers are too small and error-prone to succeed, that might not last. The U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology, for example, is analyzing 69 methods to see which ones are resistant to quantum hacking.

      Hemmer, P., & Wrachtrup, J. (2009). Physics. Where is my quantum computer? Science (New York, N.Y.), 324(5926), 473-474.

      Several computer scientists discuss and analyze the results of experiments involving simple quantum circuits that outdid equivalent classical circuits in small scale experiments, showing promise as far back as 2009 for quantum computing to outdo classical computers. Specifically, the article explores quantum entanglement, where atoms at a distance can influence each other through quantum properties, creating an unbreakable cipher, and a tripwire for any would-be hackers trying to get a peek in, presenting at least some sort of improvement for cybersecurity measures through quantum physics, which could potentially counter quantum computers’ potential to hack communications, and open other avenues for countering code-cracking capabilities as they develop. In addition, it explores the possibilities of using small amounts of qubits for various tasks, such as qubits in a diamond medium that could be used as small probes in living cells, quantum imaging to produce high-resolution images, and atomic clocks that could measure relativistic effects.

      Marcos Lopez de Prado. Singularity University Summits. (2016). Quantum Computing Exponential Finance [online video]. Available from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kU7vk9jmQC8

      A professor with research in quantum computing discusses how quantum computing could be used to create nearly perfectly financial models of reality by simulating the inherent randomness of reality. Classical computers can’t model reality as it is very well without very, very large computers because reality is something like multiple problems with solutions happening all at once, and constantly changing. Because reality is dynamic, it requires the ability to solve them all simultaneously to get the best prediction. Normal computer processing units are linear, which means they can’t really handle multiple problems at once unless you have multiple processing units. Parallelism is the concept of taking a problem, splitting it up into pieces, and solving each tiny part individually to reach a solution at the end. Classical computers cannot do this easily, whereas quantum computers are much more suited to the task, able to do it with a single processing unit. In effect, this means that quantum computers could predict the future at a level where you could confidently say, given the existing variables (whatever the variables are), this is where things are heading. Normal computers couldn’t predict or model the financial crash of 2008. Quantum computers, on the other hand, if they became refined enough, could. With such a level of knowledge of the economy, economics could be revolutionized, with the ability to make decisions to confidently avoid disastrous outcomes. On the other hand, it could give malicious actors the information they need to model how they’ll make decisions to everyone’s detriment if they so choose to.

      Lloyd, S., Mohseni, M., & Rebentrost, P. (2014). Quantum principal component analysis. Nature Physics, 10(9), 631-633.

      Computer scientists mathematically work out how a quantum algorithm compares to a computer algorithm in handling matrices of varying dimensions. They find that computing the eigenvectors from the eigenvalues of the matrices is exponentially faster with quantum computers than classical computers, handling the procedure in logarithmic time compared to the linear time for a classical computer. Because of this, quantum algorithms would be able to drastically speed up machine learning, allowing machine learning to be applied to larger data sets. Fundamentally, this means that machine-learning used for pattern recognition to tailor its functions to becomes far better. Machine learning is already used in applications like search engines to tailor the results to the individual habits of users. Quantum computers could do this task much better. Theoretically, human behavior could be mapped and predicted by computers far more effectively in general, which could be used in various ways. It could be used to predict customer behaviors more, but it could be used as part of preventative measures. If you had enough data of the right type, you could predict negative behaviors more effectively and thus use it to better prevent people from spiraling into negative behavior patterns where you can apply such computational methods.

      Martinez, E. A., Muschik, C. A., Schindler, P., Nigg, D., Erhard, A., Heyl, M., ... & Blatt, R. (2016). Real-time dynamics of lattice gauge theories with a few-qubit quantum computer. Nature, 534(7608), 516.

      Researchers in particle physics created a small quantum computer that modeled particle structures at the quantum level. The particles under consideration were electron-positron pairs that are produced in a vacuum due to quantum fluctuations. Whereas classical computers cannot do so very accurately, the quantum computer did, and the experimental results agreed with the theoretical models that the researchers went into the experiment with. In other words, quantum computers grant us the ability to effectively observe quantum mechanics and atomic physics in real-time with certainty, whereas we could only really guess with classical computers. Because of this, researchers in Physics can conduct far more accurate experiments on subject matters in particle physics, drastically increasing the rate at which we further understand the fundamental building blocks of the universe with certainty. Theoretically, confirming or denying assertations about particles or types of particles under consideration could be accelerated. For example, the Higgs-Boson required the large Hadron Collider and a supercomputer to discover. With quantum computers, this process could be optimized further. At the very least, the supercomputer part of such contraptions could be significantly improved.

      O’Malley, P. J., Babbush, R., Kivlichan, I. D., Romero, J., McClean, J. R., Barends, R., ... & Campbell, B. (2016). Scalable quantum simulation of molecular energies. Physical Review X, 6(3), 031007.

      A large group of chemists and computer scientists created and used a quantum computer that could simulate molecular energies, whereas normal computers have trouble doing so or cannot model these molecular energies. The researchers computed the energy surface of molecular hydrogen very accurately and used it to correctly predict a specific energy result (dissociation energy). It was strictly limited to a small scale (a few atoms at most), but the implications are immense. Scientists would be able to precisely calculate the rates of chemical reactions and enable the designing of new materials by just strictly using computers and lessen the need for labs in the research of new materials. Theoretically, you could create new chemical compounds and materials for a variety of applications just using a high-tech computer. For example, structural materials, like carbon nanotubes, could be designed after a session of computer simulations and analyzations of those computer simulations. Such advancements would drastically accelerate material research and allow us to create materials with a depth of understanding we have never had before. Nanotechnology would benefit from this the most, as it deals with the lowest levels of chemical structures just above the quantum level, which these computers can accurately model.

      Robert E. Campbell Sr. (2019). Evaluation of Post-Quantum Distributed Ledger Cryptography. The Journal of The British Blockchain Association, 2(1), 1-8.

      Robert E. Campbell, a researcher and university professor, explores possible cryptographic methods (such as “qTESLA”) to improve cybersecurity measures before quantum computers become more efficient and can crack existing cybersecurity measures. In particular, he stresses creating cryptography measures that resist both classical hacking methods and quantum hacking methods, which makes sense because you don’t want encryptions that can be easily cracked by one of two methods. He emphasizes that the rate of progress on research in the field of quantum computing is an unknown and the exact date that quantum computers can take out existing cryptography measures is also unknown, so he believes it is important to start working on cybersecurity measures resistant to quantum computer hacking now. The method he explores, qTESLA, satisfies the criteria of being resistant to predicted quantum computer hacking capabilities, but is troublesome in terms of size relative to existing classical computers and has hope that the method can be further refined to overcome this issue. Overall, I think the article is important for gaining an idea of the cybersecurity risks now and later, and what circumstances are involved that contribute to those risks. In particular, the relationship between private sectors, organizations, and the government when it comes to cybersecurity measures. Will all of those sectors be able to coordinate to prepare for fault-tolerant quantum computers (quantum computers that don’t bug out too much to the point of impracticality)?

      Solenov, D., Brieler, J., & Scherrer, J. (2018). The Potential of Quantum Computing and Machine Learning to Advance Clinical Research and Change the Practice of Medicine. Missouri Medicine, 115(5), 463-467.

      Physicists and medical doctors discuss how Quantum Computers could be used in the medical field to examine patients and how to use that information to adapt medical practices, in addition to how quantum computing could assist in medical technology as it applies to directly curing patients. For example, the article discusses how quantum computers, with their ability to process vast amounts of data, could theoretically create a hyper-individualized health care system, where all the little quirks of a patient’s case can be used to come up with the closest thing to a perfect prognosis. Any variety of individual conditions and circumstances you have would also be recorded in a database, accessible by quantum algorithms to help determine conclusions. In addition, it could be used for ultra-precise imaging. For example, because the quantum computer can deal with more variables than an equivalent classical computer, its results will be far more precise, and so you can use that precision in eliminating cancer cells without affecting healthy cells. Overall, it’s impressive just how much quantum computing could advance the medical field, and just in the area of understanding individual patients at a molecular level. Quantum computing could be used to help implement nanotechnology in cures. For example, if someone has a particular disorder or condition at the cellular level, then probes created with specifications in line with the patient’s individual circumstances could target the source of the disorder.

      Wow that's a lot lol. I'll take it in baby steps

      Comment


        Originally posted by Chara View Post

        Wow that's a lot lol. I'll take it in baby steps
        It's a lot of material. Here's a suggestion; if you look up the articles for reading, do not get caught up too much in the super technical details of what these articles talk about if they prop up. Like, if a fat equation rears its ugly head, don't get caught up in it too much.

        I would suggest reading the abstract, the introduction, brushing through the midsection (not too much) and checking the discussion at the end and you should have more or less have the basic gist of what the development is and what it means, though you may need to reread some of the parts of it too.
        Last edited by RussianCoffeeAddict; November 23rd, 2019, 10:34 PM.

        Comment


          Just got home late as heck waiting for one of my sellers outside the hospital. She'd been taking care of her significant other these past several days after he had a pretty gruesome automobile accident. She went in today, ran into a woman he had been having a love affair with, came outside in tears....Goddamnit, dude, lol....

          I really don't understand what the hell goes on in the minds of some people. This guy got into an accident, lost his income, probably will lose his arm, and you'd think he'd be holding onto whatever he has left. You'd think he would be grasping, with the one good arm he has now because the other one's fucked, to keep what few joys he has in his life. Nope. He decided, I want to go all the way, I want to lose my wife and kids, too, I want to toss away the people who have been sacrificing work and sleep to make sure I'm alright after an accident that will render me jobless. Like, what the hell is wrong with you, dude?

          Lol...I don't get it, honestly. Just ungrateful, just completely stupid and ungrateful. How much of a broken and dumb piece of shit do you have to be to give that little of a damn, not only about your family but even about yourself to just throw it all away while being in that situation and depending so much on them to look after you. What a shitty dumbass.

          Comment


            Originally posted by Helly View Post
            Just got home late as heck waiting for one of my sellers outside the hospital. She'd been taking care of her significant other these past several days after he had a pretty gruesome automobile accident. She went in today, ran into a woman he had been having a love affair with, came outside in tears....Goddamnit, dude, lol....

            I really don't understand what the hell goes on in the minds of some people. This guy got into an accident, lost his income, probably will lose his arm, and you'd think he'd be holding onto whatever he has left. You'd think he would be grasping, with the one good arm he has now because the other one's fucked, to keep what few joys he has in his life. Nope. He decided, I want to go all the way, I want to lose my wife and kids, too, I want to toss away the people who have been sacrificing work and sleep to make sure I'm alright after an accident that will render me jobless. Like, what the hell is wrong with you, dude?

            Lol...I don't get it, honestly. Just ungrateful, just completely stupid and ungrateful. How much of a broken and dumb piece of shit do you have to be to give that little of a damn, not only about your family but even about yourself to just throw it all away while being in that situation and depending so much on them to look after you. What a shitty dumbass.
            I'm assuming they were having an affair before the accident, so she was visiting him too and they happened to run into each other at the same time.

            I agree, though. Shit's fucked. I will never understand why people cheat despite the consequences, but I learned that in order to truly understand those people, you basically have to think like they do, so at least I have the luxury of ignorance there.

            Comment


              bad news hope this doesn't ruin anyone's day

              https://kotaku.com/battleborn-is-shu...021-1840037358

              Comment


                >exams start in a day
                >get the flu
                like clockwork

                Comment


                  Didnt have much to do today, which oddly has started having the effect of making me super-anxious as of late. Idk, I guess I got used to having a much heavier workload, but w/e......Was far too restless to really do anything in the way of music so I decided to apply myself to something a big more mechanical and gave Renpy another go. I've figured out how to write scripts for point systems and how to set flags, which is going to be super-useful for the visual novel if it ever gets done lol....this is great, though. I want there to be a multitude of possible storylines that are all dramatically different from each other, and a number of variations within those branching storylines dependingon how you build your relationships with each character. My progress already has been quite significant, and it doesn't look like I'll be struggling too much to advance even further.....so

                  yea.....This is uh, this is pretty neat, lol. I'm starting to like this VN stuff. Looks like the hardest things might actually just be the creative side - makin music (although I already have a number of simple tracks that could be repurposed for this interactive novel), drawing the things (which will definitely take forever unless i get a tablet lol), and writing the story......I know how to plant flags, man, what else is there to a VN? Lmao.

                  this is so cool, man, this is really cool....yknow.....you guys, if yall are ever feeling anxious about shit, just go figure something out. yknow? Go look up tutorials on YT, look for something that'll help you with that leaky faucet you have in the bathroom, and then just pull the shit apart and start figuring it out. Do something constructive, man, pretty soon you'll forget all about whatever the heck was bothering you. That's what drives us forward as humans, that's how we work shit out in our heads and get our dopamine kicks - figuring shit out. It's so frikkin nice, lol.


                  Originally posted by Thar View Post

                  I'm assuming they were having an affair before the accident, so she was visiting him too and they happened to run into each other at the same time.

                  I agree, though. Shit's fucked. I will never understand why people cheat despite the consequences, but I learned that in order to truly understand those people, you basically have to think like they do, so at least I have the luxury of ignorance there.
                  Yea, they had history. But also, he had told his wife not to come to the hospital that day - supposedly, to let her rest for a day, but she had a gut feeling that something was off and went to check it out.

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                    Helly Hey dude, I pulled out of your patreon for now. Nothing personal, just financial situation

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                    • Helly
                      Helly commented
                      Editing a comment
                      ah....not a prob, i understand. work hard out there, fren =)

                    How is americans so dumb? Still haven't figured out that problem but I do know it seems to be concentrated to red states and cowards.

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                      Originally posted by Kajin_Style View Post
                      How is americans so dumb?
                      I isn't know man it's a mystery
                      Originally posted by Kajin_Style
                      I have this illness called "Having-a-Heart" and gives me this irrational sense of empathy and care for my fellow man.

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                        Once this quarter is over, I'm gonna write up all the shit that I shouldn't do next quarters.

                        Like spending 5 hours after 10:00 PM on break days dicking around going "MiNd BlOwN" on computer shit when I know that next week is gonna be work-heavy...
                        Last edited by RussianCoffeeAddict; December 3rd, 2019, 12:56 AM.

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                          ...I am so stressed that I cannot sleep...

                          And I don’t know how to fix it.

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                            Originally posted by RussianCoffeeAddict View Post
                            ...I am so stressed that I cannot sleep...

                            And I don’t know how to fix it.
                            Drugs, usually. Like, Melatonin (or Heroin, if you prefer)

                            but if you're still up at 5 am, then exhaustion will hit you eventually, but that's not gonna do much good during finals week.
                            Originally posted by Wade
                            Everything is hidden in plain sight, like in Men in Black. We've all just been neuralized to think it is "normal".

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                              Originally posted by OrganizationXV View Post

                              Drugs, usually.
                              40 ounces of ultra-caffeinated coffee, gotcha.

                              but if you're still up at 5 am, then exhaustion will hit you eventually, but that's not gonna do much good during finals week.
                              I went to bed at like 3 AM and lapsed and relapsed to 7 AM.

                              ...Wouldn’t have mattered if I got a good sleep anyway, the programming exam was a whole lot of sitting and mulling over what I don’t know...

                              Great start going into the second midterm of one of my classes tomorrow.

                              ...I know what I’m gonna be doing for the rest of the day.

                              0D059E17-50FB-46C2-8083-5485E4B052C6.jpeg

                              ...Studying this shit...fun.

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                                Originally posted by RussianCoffeeAddict View Post
                                ...I am so stressed that I cannot sleep...

                                And I don’t know how to fix it.
                                cut down on the caffeine

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                                  Originally posted by Louay View Post

                                  cut down on the caffeine
                                  I finished my 30 ounces of coffee 4 hours before I hit the bed and I’ve had more than that before immediately falling asleep...probably not the issue, lol.

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                                    Originally posted by RussianCoffeeAddict View Post
                                    ...I am so stressed that I cannot sleep...

                                    And I don’t know how to fix it.
                                    Hit up brazzers.com

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                                      Anyone ever have the thing where their mind starts having an existential crisis just as you start to fall asleep, and then those thoughts make you wake up numb because you're partially sleep-paralysis'd, and your brain is just like WTF IS GOING ON, AM I EVEN REAL

                                      yea, that's always fun




                                      Originally posted by RussianCoffeeAddict View Post

                                      I finished my 30 ounces of coffee 4 hours before I hit the bed and I’ve had more than that before immediately falling asleep...probably not the issue, lol.
                                      Animal products can take up to 20 years to start taking their terrible toll on your body, so something similar might be happening with your caffeine addiction. Maybe cut back on it.

                                      Comment


                                        Originally posted by Helly View Post
                                        Animal products can take up to 20 years to start taking their terrible toll on your body, so something similar might be happening with your caffeine addiction. Maybe cut back on it.
                                        After finals.

                                        I’m gonna need all the ounces I can get in the mean time...

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