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    Can someone recommend some good erotic fanfiction?

    Preferably with Widowmaker in it

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      Eren Ask pornhub users or something. I mean there's 50 shades of grey... but I don't think you would be into it all that very much.


      MEMES ARE DREAMS IN YOUR GENES

      Comment


        So I've recently invested myself into The Gulag Archipelago and I'm around 200+ pages into it across a few weeks (school has gotten in the way of reading it). I've become particularly invested in continuing to read it for various reasons:

        1. It addresses the inner workings of a totalitarian regime quite a bit and how it operates in order to achieve its goals and to sustain itself, even if it's only about the Soviet Union. I'm also into it because it gives a thorough view of what it was like to live in the Soviet Union on a daily basis and to live in its worse sectors, but that's not the only reason.

        2. It delves into a variety of interesting subjects, like human morality, human nature, and such. It's very thought-provoking overall.

        3. It has an intriguing style to it. It reminds me a little bit of Mr. Sunshine's posting style but without some of the flaws (bad structure, "word barf"). It grips you, and it seems to investigate many facets of the situations and subjects that it covers, but it does so without piling on anything that feels like filler, and you feel like you're getting a comprehensive yet compact view of everything covered and it works its darndest to give you a thorough understanding of...well, a lot of things. It's simply a great read.

        Here's a nice taste of what the book is like:


        And how we burned in the camps later, thinking: What would things have been like if every Security operative, when he went out at night to make an arrest, had been uncertain whether he would return alive and had to say good-bye to his family?

        Or if, during periods of mass arrests, as for example in Leningrad, when they arrested a quarter of the city, people had not simply sat there in their lairs, paling with terror at every bang of the downstairs door and at every step on the staircase, but had understood they had nothing left to lose and had boldly set up in the downstairs hall an ambush of half a dozen people with axes, hammers, pokers, or whatever else was at hand? After all, you knew ahead of time that those bluecaps were out at night for no good purpose. And you could be sure ahead of time that you’d be cracking the skull of a cutthroat.

        Or what about the Black Maria sitting out there on the street with one lonely chauffeur. What if it had been driven off or its tires spiked? The Organs would very quickly have suffered a shortage of officers and transport and notwithstanding all of Stalin’s thirst, the cursed machine would have ground to a halt! If...if...

        We didn’t love freedom enough. And even more—we had no awareness of the real situation. We spent ourselves in one unrestrained outburst in 1917, and then we hurried to submit. We submitted with pleasure!... We purely and simply deserved everything that happened afterward.



        (Not from where I'm at currently at.)

        The book regularly hits you with such stuff. I highly recommend it to anyone who has the time to read it. All three volumes encapsulate about 2000 pages, unabridged, and I've heard that the abridged version has just under 500 pages.

        No need to buy it, either:
        It's available here in the form of a PDF reader, and you can even download a PDF of the full thing.

        I'll continue to slog through it in the meantime. The audiobook is also available on Youtube for curious souls, but it's 70+ hours long, and the narrator might not be to your guys' tastes.
        Last edited by Phobetor; March 17th, 2018, 12:51 AM.

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          Cid, what is yer site doing? Lol. I keep editing the post to try and fix that little formatting gap in the quote, and it won't go away, but everything else I edit works out fine.

          Comment


          • Phobetor
            Phobetor commented
            Editing a comment
            It looks like it's fixed now, if I understood your meaning. :}

          • RussianCoffeeAddict
            Editing a comment
            Phobby
            It doesn't seem to be fixed on my end. It still automatically splits into two quotes, even right after I edit it.

            I've had a similar problem before, although what happened is that the post in the editing box was different from the post as it was presented and it went away after a while. I guess this will too. *Shrug.*

          • Phobetor
            Phobetor commented
            Editing a comment
            Sorry; I wasn't online earlier.

            The issue should be resolved now. :}

            I used the source editor to modify all the BBCode directly, and it seems that several extraneous font and size tags were causing the problem.

          Originally posted by RussianCoffeeAddict View Post
          Cid, what is yer site doing? Lol. I keep editing the post to try and fix that little formatting gap in the quote, and it won't go away, but everything else I edit works out fine.
          No clue, honestly.

          Comment


            Done with volume 1 of The Gulag Archipelago and moving on to volume 2. Very good so far.

            Comment


              Reading two books in. Sudhir kakar's Indian identity, Basically a case study of Indian society from a psychoanalysis viewpoint. Then there's Peter L Berger's the social construction of reality, just started today. I was reading Sophie's choice a while back, an excellent introduction to the history of philosophy. And I was trying to read this anthology of female Iranian writers.

              Comment


                Nethescurial by Thomas Ligotti
                Flipper - Brainwash

                Comment


                  Read:
                  Leo Tolstoy, The Death of Ivan Ilyich - Pretty powerful stuff. Gonna read more of Tolstoy in the future.

                  Reading:
                  Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian - Cormac's pragmatic and fluid style is a bit hard to follow if you're not paying attention, especially when multiple people are speaking, but once you get used to it, it's a pretty interesting story. So far, at least.
                  Originally posted by Oneiros
                  In that case, I’m the biggest faggot on the block.

                  Comment


                    Reading Medical Aparthied by Harriet A. Washington.

                    Preeetty dark stuff in here. Educational and Eye opening, but dark.

                    Comment


                      Originally posted by Doctor. View Post
                      Read:
                      Leo Tolstoy, The Death of Ivan Ilyich - Pretty powerful stuff. Gonna read more of Tolstoy in the future.

                      Reading:
                      Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian - Cormac's pragmatic and fluid style is a bit hard to follow if you're not paying attention, especially when multiple people are speaking, but once you get used to it, it's a pretty interesting story. So far, at least.
                      Tolstoy? That's a 140 IQ level read.

                      Comment


                        Originally posted by #83.6666666667 View Post

                        Tolstoy? That's a 140 IQ level read.
                        Sometimes I gotta downgrade
                        Originally posted by Oneiros
                        In that case, I’m the biggest faggot on the block.

                        Comment


                          Doctor. , Chomsky cites this French bloke that claims that depending on what language you use/think it will be a different way of writing than if you use a different language. Seeing as you are both bilingual and studied linguistic what is your take on this?

                          Aspects of the Theory of Syntax by Noam Chomsky.
                          Last edited by #83.6666666667; August 7th, 2018, 09:10 PM.

                          Comment


                            Originally posted by Doctor. View Post
                            Read:
                            Leo Tolstoy, The Death of Ivan Ilyich - Pretty powerful stuff. Gonna read more of Tolstoy in the future.
                            Nice.

                            Since you've presumably read Cormac by now, might I suggest Conrad? Namely, Heart of Darkness. You'd probably enjoy it.
                            Last edited by Oneiros; August 8th, 2018, 02:56 AM.

                            Comment


                              Originally posted by Oneiros View Post
                              Since you've presumably read Cormac by now, might I suggest Conrad? Namely, Heart of Darkness. You'd probably enjoy it.

                              I have to read HoD whether I want to or not, since it's part of next year's curriculum. I read An Outpost of Progress this year and enjoyed it though.

                              Originally posted by #83.6666666667 View Post
                              Chomsky cites this French bloke that claims that depending on what language you use/think it will be a different way of writing than if you use a different language. Seeing as you are both bilingual and studied linguistic what is your take on this?

                              Aspects of the Theory of Syntax by Noam Chomsky.
                              I'm trilingual, soon to be quadrilingual. Get it right faggot.

                              I studied Chomsky during my first year of college. He's citing Ferdinand de Saussure, probably. I'm not sure specifically what you're talking about, as I haven't read the book (I'll look into it, though), but he's probably referring to his concepts of linguistic competence and performance, which build on Saussure's concepts of langue and parole. Linguistic competence refers to an inherent and intuitive knowledge of a language's syntax, phonetics, semantics and so on. It's why you intuitively know how to speak and can understand English as a native English speaker without thinking about the way sentences are formed. This doesn't mean your English is flawless 100% of the time though, and this is where his concept of linguistic performance comes in; you can make errors in sentences that don't derive from a lack of knowledge, but are instead based on psychological or social factors. I haven't studied his theories on foreign speakers, so I can only theorize and give my own personal view when it comes to this subject.

                              Since most languages have different rules (even the ones that belong to the same family tree), a foreign speaker can no longer benefit from that inherent and intuitive knowledge of a language's structure the same way a native speaker can (mostly because they failed to learn the language during childhood which is when this acquisition process takes place) and has to apply themselves and learn the language as a system of rules; meaning they have to think beforehand about every sentence they make. As someone who learned English as a child (though not very extensively) and is completely fluent in the language, even I have some trouble regarding more complex sentences when it comes to verb placement and prepositions, I have to think about how to form the sentence for a second or two; that's because Portuguese is a completely different language structurally and, implicitly, my brain tries to form sentences in the same fashion I would do it for Portuguese. There are certain expressions and sentence structure that work in Portuguese but not in English. Curiously enough, I also make the same mistake with Portuguese sometimes and use some English expressions and forms that simply don't work in Portuguese. But I think that's a byproduct of learning both languages at the same time, I still consider speaking English basically second-nature at this point. With Spanish, for instance, I find it much more difficult to speak, even though it's a much closer language to Portuguese than English is. German is even worse, as it's just very stressful trying to string a sentence together, but I'll just chalk that up to still being intermediate in terms of fluency.

                              Basically where I'm getting at,
                              learning languages as a child = speaking it is second-nature
                              learning languages as a teen/adult = learning is a difficult process, speaking it is bothersome and stressful, sometimes even when fluent
                              making structural mistakes with your native language = social/psychological factors
                              making structural mistakes with a learned language = trying, probably subconsciously, to apply rules from your native language to this language in order to fill the gaps in your knowledge

                              I should read Chomsky's thoughts on foreign speakers and see if it fits with my thoughts. As long as I ignore his political work, he's a good read.
                              Originally posted by Oneiros
                              In that case, I’m the biggest faggot on the block.

                              Comment


                                Originally posted by Doctor. View Post
                                I have to read HoD whether I want to or not, since it's part of next year's curriculum. I read An Outpost of Progress this year and enjoyed it though.


                                I'm trilingual, soon to be quadrilingual. Get it right faggot.

                                I studied Chomsky during my first year of college. He's citing Ferdinand de Saussure, probably. I'm not sure specifically what you're talking about, as I haven't read the book (I'll look into it, though), but he's probably referring to his concepts of linguistic competence and performance, which build on Saussure's concepts of langue and parole. Linguistic competence refers to an inherent and intuitive knowledge of a language's syntax, phonetics, semantics and so on. It's why you intuitively know how to speak and can understand English as a native English speaker without thinking about the way sentences are formed. This doesn't mean your English is flawless 100% of the time though, and this is where his concept of linguistic performance comes in; you can make errors in sentences that don't derive from a lack of knowledge, but are instead based on psychological or social factors. I haven't studied his theories on foreign speakers, so I can only theorize and give my own personal view when it comes to this subject.

                                Since most languages have different rules (even the ones that belong to the same family tree), a foreign speaker can no longer benefit from that inherent and intuitive knowledge of a language's structure the same way a native speaker can (mostly because they failed to learn the language during childhood which is when this acquisition process takes place) and has to apply themselves and learn the language as a system of rules; meaning they have to think beforehand about every sentence they make. As someone who learned English as a child (though not very extensively) and is completely fluent in the language, even I have some trouble regarding more complex sentences when it comes to verb placement and prepositions, I have to think about how to form the sentence for a second or two; that's because Portuguese is a completely different language structurally and, implicitly, my brain tries to form sentences in the same fashion I would do it for Portuguese. There are certain expressions and sentence structure that work in Portuguese but not in English. Curiously enough, I also make the same mistake with Portuguese sometimes and use some English expressions and forms that simply don't work in Portuguese. But I think that's a byproduct of learning both languages at the same time, I still consider speaking English basically second-nature at this point. With Spanish, for instance, I find it much more difficult to speak, even though it's a much closer language to Portuguese than English is. German is even worse, as it's just very stressful trying to string a sentence together, but I'll just chalk that up to still being intermediate in terms of fluency.

                                Basically where I'm getting at,
                                learning languages as a child = speaking it is second-nature
                                learning languages as a teen/adult = learning is a difficult process, speaking it is bothersome and stressful, sometimes even when fluent
                                making structural mistakes with your native language = social/psychological factors
                                making structural mistakes with a learned language = trying, probably subconsciously, to apply rules from your native language to this language in order to fill the gaps in your knowledge

                                I should read Chomsky's thoughts on foreign speakers and see if it fits with my thoughts. As long as I ignore his political work, he's a good read.
                                You only speak 4 languages...weak.

                                This is perhaps one of the best posts in this site, but what I understood from the quote was that not only do you think differently in other languages but also have a different personality. Is this the case with you? Are you more serious when you speak English and German and more loose and charismatic when you speak Spanish and Portuguese? For instance, "la concha de tu madre" is quite a funny Argentinian insult. I don't think English nor German have such a phrase. This inevitably has a consequence in how someone thinks, no?

                                Comment


                                  Originally posted by #83.6666666667 View Post
                                  but what I understood from the quote was that not only do you think differently in other languages but also have a different personality. Is this the case with you? Are you more serious when you speak English and German and more loose and charismatic when you speak Spanish and Portuguese? For instance, "la concha de tu madre" is quite a funny Argentinian insult. I don't think English nor German have such a phrase. This inevitably has a consequence in how someone thinks, no?
                                  Personality may be a bit different from language to language, but I think that's more to do with how limited your vocabulary is when speaking a different language. You can be perfectly fluent in a foreign language but if your vocabulary isn't as extensive as it is with your native language (9 times out of 10, it won't be), then you're not gonna be communicating your thoughts clearly enough. You can find synonyms for the word you're missing, but that will inevitably shift the way the sentence is interpreted.

                                  I personally don't think a specific language has a specific property that can change the personality of someone speaking it (I think that just boils down to the stereotypes we associate with certain languages/cultures, such as thinking that German sounds angry and hostile, whereas French sounds soothing and erotic; it's just an arbitrary interpretation that stuck and integrated itself into society), but I'll have to look into what Chomsky said specifically to see where he's getting at; I may agree depending on what he's saying or change my mind.
                                  Originally posted by Oneiros
                                  In that case, I’m the biggest faggot on the block.

                                  Comment


                                    Originally posted by Doctor. View Post
                                    Personality may be a bit different from language to language, but I think that's more to do with how limited your vocabulary is when speaking a different language. You can be perfectly fluent in a foreign language but if your vocabulary isn't as extensive as it is with your native language (9 times out of 10, it won't be), then you're not gonna be communicating your thoughts clearly enough. You can find synonyms for the word you're missing, but that will inevitably shift the way the sentence is interpreted.

                                    I personally don't think a specific language has a specific property that can change the personality of someone speaking it (I think that just boils down to the stereotypes we associate with certain languages/cultures, such as thinking that German sounds angry and hostile, whereas French sounds soothing and erotic; it's just an arbitrary interpretation that stuck and integrated itself into society), but I'll have to look into what Chomsky said specifically to see where he's getting at; I may agree depending on what he's saying or change my mind.
                                    A few things to clarify, neither Chomsky or Diderot actually say that language changes personality; explicitly. I more or less gathered that from what Diderot said as an extension of his reasoning. And I don't think Chomsky agrees with Diderot, he calls his view naive.

                                    "Diderot concludes that French is unique among languages in the degree to which the order of words corresponds to the natural order of thoughts and ideas (Diderot, 1751)." (Chomsky, 5)

                                    "Thus "whatever the order of terms in an ancient or modern language, the writer's mind followed the didactic order of French syntax" (p.390); "We say things in French, as the mind is forced to consider them in whatever language we write" (p. 371)..."our pedestrian language has on others the advantage of the useful over the pleasant" (p.372); thus French is appropriate for the science, whereas Greek, Latin, Italian, and English "are more advantageous for letters." Moreover, "common sense would choose the French language; but... imagination and passions will giver preference to the ancient languages those of our neighbors... we must speak French in society and in schools of philosophy; and Greek, Latin, English, in pulpits and theaters;...our language will be that of truth, if ever it ever t returns to the earth; and...the Greek, the Latin and the others will fable the languages of the fable the men of dreams. French is made to instruct, enlighten and convince; Greek, Latin, Italian, English, to persuade, move and deceive: speak Greek, Latin, Italian to the people; but speak French to the sage. (pp. 371- 372" (pp 5-6)
                                    I took the liberty of translating the French to English.

                                    Being able to speak more than one language I kind of see what Diderot is saying, of course I take it a step into a different direction and implement (from my own experience) personality shift. And I seem to have a slight personality change when I speak a different language. I thought I'd ask you your thoughts on this to see if maybe you experience the same thing. Which you don't. Something to consider, some languages have unique phrases that don't translate at all into other languages (as you pointed out already), so I think this too has to do with personality shifts in language. I mean how do you say "la concha de tu madre" in English, French, or German with it still maintaining its complete meaning, including its cultural meaning? I think that charismatic flare adds to the languages personality. By no means do I intent to say that these traits are biological inherent and cannot be implanted into a different language, however I think there is more to this than just chance.

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                                    • Doctor.
                                      Doctor. commented
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                                      Which languages do you speak again

                                    • #83.6666666667
                                      #83.6666666667 commented
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                                      A couple.
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