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Any of you interested in history or social sciences or acedemics on general

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    #21
    I like the nazis

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      #22
      Originally posted by Randoguy View Post
      Any favourites in these? I really find how People lived and worked to be interesting. And how states legitimized themselves and power worked.
      for some time, asian history and empires captivated me, but honestly, all of it is very interesting.

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        #23
        Originally posted by Randoguy View Post
        Look up Alexander's conquests, the harrapan civilization in India, the Babylonian empires. These are a lot already. And technically wild west is mordern technology.
        Modern technology is robots and cell phones

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          #24
          Originally posted by Randoguy View Post
          I will finish my undergraduate in history soon, and I really like the subject, and finding out about people and places and why. Any of you here interested in acedemics, and what? How do you conduct resarch and verify ideas in your field? That's very interesting.
          What parts of history did you study and why?

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            #25
            Originally posted by Randoguy View Post
            Look up Alexander's conquests, the harrapan civilization in India, the Babylonian empires. These are a lot already. And technically wild west is mordern technology.
            Haven't really read Alexander's work, what do you find most fascinating about Alexander and what he did?

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              #26
              History in its totality fascinates me; the progression of events from our existence as a moderately handy species of intelligent apes with simple clanlike social structures and stone tools to the modern age of nation-states, globalized trade and geopolitics, and technological advancement.

              ...every link in the chain along the way...every point where something old had to give way to something new...how it all came together to form the modern world...what where we've been tells us about where we're heading...

              There's a level of intellectual curiosity that has to be dead inside if it doesn't all call out to you and demand to be understood.

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                #27
                I'm quite an appassionate of history, it was one of my favourite school subjects.

                And in part i must thanks games like Age of Empires, Empire Earth and Total War.

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                  #28
                  Originally posted by Post-Crisis Shob View Post
                  History in its totality fascinates me; the progression of events from our existence as a moderately handy species of intelligent apes with simple clanlike social structures and stone tools to the modern age of nation-states, globalized trade and geopolitics, and technological advancement.

                  ...every link in the chain along the way...every point where something old had to give way to something new...how it all came together to form the modern world...what where we've been tells us about where we're heading...

                  There's a level of intellectual curiosity that has to be dead inside if it doesn't all call out to you and demand to be understood.
                  Well spoken, Shob.
                  Originally posted by Wade
                  It isn't date rape if God commands it, and he already commanded it.

                  Originally posted by Wade
                  I'm saying we actually don't know for certain that 1kg is 1kg.

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                    #29
                    Originally posted by Post-Crisis Shob View Post
                    History in its totality fascinates me; the progression of events from our existence as a moderately handy species of intelligent apes with simple clanlike social structures and stone tools to the modern age of nation-states, globalized trade and geopolitics, and technological advancement.

                    ...every link in the chain along the way...every point where something old had to give way to something new...how it all came together to form the modern world...what where we've been tells us about where we're heading...

                    There's a level of intellectual curiosity that has to be dead inside if it doesn't all call out to you and demand to be understood.


                    " Look again at that dot. That's here. That's home. That's us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every "superstar," every "supreme leader," every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there--on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

                    The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds.

                    Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

                    The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.

                    It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we've ever known."

                    -- Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot, 1994

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                      #30
                      Originally posted by #83.6666666667 View Post

                      What parts of history did you study and why?
                      Indian history, colonialism, And the like. What fascinates me the most is how legitimacy for a political system is contructed via devotional, fiscal and other spheres. As for Alexander, he created a empire in a brief span of time and covered much of the known world. His conquests allowed for greater contacts of east and west, his state had different groups merged into a common ruling elite, and his successor states influnced the world for another three or so centuries.

                      Comment


                        #31
                        Originally posted by Post-Crisis Shob View Post
                        History in its totality fascinates me; the progression of events from our existence as a moderately handy species of intelligent apes with simple clanlike social structures and stone tools to the modern age of nation-states, globalized trade and geopolitics, and technological advancement.

                        ...every link in the chain along the way...every point where something old had to give way to something new...how it all came together to form the modern world...what where we've been tells us about where we're heading...

                        There's a level of intellectual curiosity that has to be dead inside if it doesn't all call out to you and demand to be understood.
                        The most interesting part of history is that at its core history means a narrative of events for a group. So you can have so many interesting ways of viewing the world and what the people think when doing so and reasons why, and how people even a few centuries ago viewed the world in a very different light. It's crazy.

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                          #32
                          On a scale of 1-10 how much are you regretting those 4 yrs of easy history courses, just to earn a history degree?

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                            #33
                            Originally posted by Zeroextra View Post
                            On a scale of 1-10 how much are you regretting those 4 yrs of easy history courses, just to earn a history degree?
                            It's three years, and it's not dumbed down or anything. Teaching could be better, but I try and learn on my own.

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                              #34
                              yeah i like comparing and contrasting points of view of historical events in various contexts

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                                #35
                                Originally posted by Saffron View Post
                                yeah i like comparing and contrasting points of view of historical events in various contexts
                                One of the most interesting books I've read recently is destiny disrupted. It's essentially a narrative of world history from the viewpoint of Islamic civilization. Very interesting

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                                  #36
                                  We in the west share a common narrative of world history. But our story largely omits a whole civilization whose citizens shared an entirely different narrative for a thousand years.
                                  i agree, imperial china really isn't considered that much in western history, although that one thousand should really be three thousand

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                                    #37
                                    Originally posted by Randoguy View Post

                                    Indian history, colonialism, And the like. What fascinates me the most is how legitimacy for a political system is contructed via devotional, fiscal and other spheres. As for Alexander, he created a empire in a brief span of time and covered much of the known world. His conquests allowed for greater contacts of east and west, his state had different groups merged into a common ruling elite, and his successor states influnced the world for another three or so centuries.
                                    I thought you would never answer me, lol. Are we talking about native americans or the original definition of Indian? Both share the same fate of colonization, so they have that in common and both invented the number zero. So the European might have been on to something there.

                                    You bring up a very interesting thing I've been thinking about. Which is legitimacy. How does one establish legitimacy, particularly if you're "American". I mean every person living in this country deep down knows that they stole the land from the natives. It is such a huge event and well known that it is impossible to hide or ignore. I feel like most people try to not talk about it. At best you get weak rationalization. For example, "Well they also took land, so why shouldn't we?", "It was a different time period", "We took it fair and square". But there is never a sense of actual reasoning to establish something that is very important, which is legitimacy. If we look at Israel, they try to establish legitimacy by saying they were there first. This brings me to what I think legitimacy actually boils down to. longevity. Can you further expand on what you mean what legitimacy means to you?

                                    You have to remember that for the Greeks/Macedonians and Persians, the known world or "civilized world" was only those two areas of the world. Which at the time was almost close to reality. You had the Chinese and Mesoamerica, but that was pretty much it. I'm not sure how well developed what is now India was but I don't think it measured up to the standards of the Greeks and Persians .So in a way the Macedonians had conquered the world.

                                    Funny thing about Alexander is that he was ambitions. Ambitious actually doesn't even come close to what he had. It is said that in his will he left the task of uniting the East and West by mixing the two populations, genetically. He was the definition of a cosmopolitan. His wish wasn't kept, but a historian notes that in a way he did unite the East and West via the Roman's adopting Christianity. And he is still influencing the world due to his conquest, it wasn't just for a few centuries.

                                    Comment


                                      #38
                                      Originally posted by #83.6666666667 View Post

                                      I thought you would never answer me, lol. Are we talking about native americans or the original definition of Indian? Both share the same fate of colonization, so they have that in common and both invented the number zero. So the European might have been on to something there.

                                      You bring up a very interesting thing I've been thinking about. Which is legitimacy. How does one establish legitimacy, particularly if you're "American". I mean every person living in this country deep down knows that they stole the land from the natives. It is such a huge event and well known that it is impossible to hide or ignore. I feel like most people try to not talk about it. At best you get weak rationalization. For example, "Well they also took land, so why shouldn't we?", "It was a different time period", "We took it fair and square". But there is never a sense of actual reasoning to establish something that is very important, which is legitimacy. If we look at Israel, they try to establish legitimacy by saying they were there first. This brings me to what I think legitimacy actually boils down to. longevity. Can you further expand on what you mean what legitimacy means to you?

                                      You have to remember that for the Greeks/Macedonians and Persians, the known world or "civilized world" was only those two areas of the world. Which at the time was almost close to reality. You had the Chinese and Mesoamerica, but that was pretty much it. I'm not sure how well developed what is now India was but I don't think it measured up to the standards of the Greeks and Persians .So in a way the Macedonians had conquered the world.

                                      Funny thing about Alexander is that he was ambitions. Ambitious actually doesn't even come close to what he had. It is said that in his will he left the task of uniting the East and West by mixing the two populations, genetically. He was the definition of a cosmopolitan. His wish wasn't kept, but a historian notes that in a way he did unite the East and West via the Roman's adopting Christianity. And he is still influencing the world due to his conquest, it wasn't just for a few centuries.
                                      I meant the Indians in the Indian subcontinent in south Asia. That's only the beginning of it. Lot of forces ensures that the US remains legitimate to all. It essentially means ensuring that a power structure is seen to be right and a world without it would be worse. Power structure includes any form of political structure, not just a centralized kingdom. Mesoamerica wasnt a part of the known world. Standards is hard to define. You dont have a unified idea of progress and a nation state. The Greeks found India strange. High politics of focusing on a conqueror is nice, but looking at the impact for the average perosn and how elite and common cultures coped is interesting too. Yeah you aren't wrong there. Alexander's conquests were a sea change.

                                      Comment


                                        #39
                                        Originally posted by Randoguy View Post

                                        I meant the Indians in the Indian subcontinent in south Asia. That's only the beginning of it. Lot of forces ensures that the US remains legitimate to all. It essentially means ensuring that a power structure is seen to be right and a world without it would be worse. Power structure includes any form of political structure, not just a centralized kingdom. Mesoamerica wasnt a part of the known world. Standards is hard to define. You dont have a unified idea of progress and a nation state. The Greeks found India strange. High politics of focusing on a conqueror is nice, but looking at the impact for the average perosn and how elite and common cultures coped is interesting too. Yeah you aren't wrong there. Alexander's conquests were a sea change.
                                        Power is a short term form of legitimacy. Reason being power fluctuates and is not constant. I didn't say China or Mesoamerica were known to the Greeks and Persians. Let's play a little game, say you are building an empire, how do you establish legitimacy when there are more powerful empires around you?

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                                          #40
                                          Originally posted by #83.6666666667 View Post

                                          Power is a short term form of legitimacy. Reason being power fluctuates and is not constant. I didn't say China or Mesoamerica were known to the Greeks and Persians. Let's play a little game, say you are building an empire, how do you establish legitimacy when there are more powerful empires around you?
                                          Venerate local cults in every area, have a land revenue system where you give out land to nobles for revenue. A recruitment system from all over the empire. Have a whole patron-cleint set up, and strict rules for who can be a part of nobility. A contract theory as to why an emperor is needed. This is enough for the beginning.

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